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Conference Paper: Pulse wave imaging of human abdominal aortas in vivo

TitlePulse wave imaging of human abdominal aortas in vivo
Authors
KeywordsAbdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Pulse Wave
Pulse Wave Velocity
Speckle Tracking Young's Modulus
Issue Date2008
Citation
Proceedings - Ieee Ultrasonics Symposium, 2008, p. 859-862 How to Cite?
AbstractVascular diseases (e.g., abdominal aortic aneurysm or, AAA) lead to changes in the regional aortic wall mechanical properties. Pulse-Wave Imaging (PWI) was previously developed by our group to map the pulse-wave propagation along the abdominal aorta of mice in vivo. In this study, the feasibility of PWI with real-time scanning is shown in human abdominalaortas in vivo. The abdominal aortas of five normal subjects and one AAA subject were scanned. A Sonix RP system (Ultrasonix Medical Corp., Burnaby, Canada) was employed with a phased array at 3.3 MHz. The beam density of the 2-D echograms was reduced to 32 beams in order to obtain a high frame rate of 180- 260 Hz. The real-time scanning reduces the artifacts from respiration and transducer motion. The velocities of the aortic wall were estimated using RF-based speckle tracking. The sequences of PWI images visually depicted the propagation of the pulse wave along the aortic wall. The regional pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was measured and used to estimate the Young's modulus of the aortic wall. In healthy volunteers (n=5), the propagation was relatively uniform, with a correlation coefficient of 0.97 ± 0.01 and a PWV of 3.73 ± 0.19 m/s. The Young's modulus of the aortic wall was 79 ± 10 kPa. In the aneurysmal aorta, the propagation of the pulse wave was relatively nonuniform with lower correlation coefficients (r=0.65). The PWV and Young's modulus of the aneurysmal aorta were both found to be higher than in the normal case. The PWI technique was successfully implemented in both normal and aneurysmal human abdominal aortas and shown to provide regional information on the mechanical properties of the aortic wall in vivo. ©2008 IEEE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167110
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, WNen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorKonofagou, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:04:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:04:14Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationProceedings - Ieee Ultrasonics Symposium, 2008, p. 859-862en_US
dc.identifier.issn1051-0117en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167110-
dc.description.abstractVascular diseases (e.g., abdominal aortic aneurysm or, AAA) lead to changes in the regional aortic wall mechanical properties. Pulse-Wave Imaging (PWI) was previously developed by our group to map the pulse-wave propagation along the abdominal aorta of mice in vivo. In this study, the feasibility of PWI with real-time scanning is shown in human abdominalaortas in vivo. The abdominal aortas of five normal subjects and one AAA subject were scanned. A Sonix RP system (Ultrasonix Medical Corp., Burnaby, Canada) was employed with a phased array at 3.3 MHz. The beam density of the 2-D echograms was reduced to 32 beams in order to obtain a high frame rate of 180- 260 Hz. The real-time scanning reduces the artifacts from respiration and transducer motion. The velocities of the aortic wall were estimated using RF-based speckle tracking. The sequences of PWI images visually depicted the propagation of the pulse wave along the aortic wall. The regional pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was measured and used to estimate the Young's modulus of the aortic wall. In healthy volunteers (n=5), the propagation was relatively uniform, with a correlation coefficient of 0.97 ± 0.01 and a PWV of 3.73 ± 0.19 m/s. The Young's modulus of the aortic wall was 79 ± 10 kPa. In the aneurysmal aorta, the propagation of the pulse wave was relatively nonuniform with lower correlation coefficients (r=0.65). The PWV and Young's modulus of the aneurysmal aorta were both found to be higher than in the normal case. The PWI technique was successfully implemented in both normal and aneurysmal human abdominal aortas and shown to provide regional information on the mechanical properties of the aortic wall in vivo. ©2008 IEEE.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposiumen_US
dc.subjectAbdominal Aortic Aneurysmen_US
dc.subjectPulse Waveen_US
dc.subjectPulse Wave Velocityen_US
dc.subjectSpeckle Tracking Young's Modulusen_US
dc.titlePulse wave imaging of human abdominal aortas in vivoen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, WN: wnlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, WN=rp01663en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/ULTSYM.2008.0207en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-63849129501en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-63849129501&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.spage859en_US
dc.identifier.epage862en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, J=7404182785en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, WN=22634980600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, S=7410338987en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKonofagou, E=7005877325en_US

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