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Article: Vitamin D deficiency is common and associated with metabolic risk factors in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

TitleVitamin D deficiency is common and associated with metabolic risk factors in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/metabol
Citation
Metabolism: Clinical And Experimental, 2011, v. 60 n. 10, p. 1475-1481 How to Cite?
AbstractBoth vitamin D deficiency and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are associated with aspects of metabolic syndrome, but it is unclear whether vitamin D deficiency contributes to the metabolic disturbances commonly found in women with PCOS. This study sought to investigate (1) the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in PCOS women in Scotland and (2) the relationship between vitamin D status and metabolic risk factors. This was an observational study on 52 women (25 in PCOS group and 27 in control group). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations less than 25 nmol/L were classified as severe vitamin D deficiency and were found in 44.0% and 11.2% of subjects in the PCOS and control groups, respectively (P =.047). Among the PCOS subjects, 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were negatively correlated with body mass index (P =.033), C-reactive protein (P =.027), and free androgen index (P =.025) and positively correlated with quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (P =.035), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (P =.033), and sex hormone binding globulin (P =.038). Associations of vitamin D deficiency with quantitative insulin sensitivity check index and HDL-C were independent of body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in PCOS women in Scotland, and a larger proportion of PCOS patients than control women were found to be vitamin D deficient. We also demonstrate correlations of vitamin D status with insulin sensitivity, HDL-C, and C-reactive protein in PCOS patients, which support the increasing evidence that vitamin D deficiency is associated with multiple metabolic risk factors in PCOS women. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167094
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.375
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.978
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, HWRen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrereton, REen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, RAen_US
dc.contributor.authorWallace, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, CKMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:03:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:03:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationMetabolism: Clinical And Experimental, 2011, v. 60 n. 10, p. 1475-1481en_US
dc.identifier.issn0026-0495en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167094-
dc.description.abstractBoth vitamin D deficiency and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are associated with aspects of metabolic syndrome, but it is unclear whether vitamin D deficiency contributes to the metabolic disturbances commonly found in women with PCOS. This study sought to investigate (1) the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in PCOS women in Scotland and (2) the relationship between vitamin D status and metabolic risk factors. This was an observational study on 52 women (25 in PCOS group and 27 in control group). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations less than 25 nmol/L were classified as severe vitamin D deficiency and were found in 44.0% and 11.2% of subjects in the PCOS and control groups, respectively (P =.047). Among the PCOS subjects, 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were negatively correlated with body mass index (P =.033), C-reactive protein (P =.027), and free androgen index (P =.025) and positively correlated with quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (P =.035), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (P =.033), and sex hormone binding globulin (P =.038). Associations of vitamin D deficiency with quantitative insulin sensitivity check index and HDL-C were independent of body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in PCOS women in Scotland, and a larger proportion of PCOS patients than control women were found to be vitamin D deficient. We also demonstrate correlations of vitamin D status with insulin sensitivity, HDL-C, and C-reactive protein in PCOS patients, which support the increasing evidence that vitamin D deficiency is associated with multiple metabolic risk factors in PCOS women. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/metabolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMetabolism: Clinical and Experimentalen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHyperandrogenism - Blood - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - Blood - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshObesity - Blood - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen_US
dc.subject.meshPolycystic Ovary Syndrome - Blood - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshScotland - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVitamin D - Analogs & Derivatives - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshVitamin D Deficiency - Blood - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleVitamin D deficiency is common and associated with metabolic risk factors in patients with polycystic ovary syndromeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, HWR: raymondli@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, HWR=rp01649en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.metabol.2011.03.002en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21550088-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052969896en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros222178-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052969896&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume60en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1475en_US
dc.identifier.epage1481en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295347900017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, HWR=8554164300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrereton, RE=53163299800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAnderson, RA=35408622600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWallace, AM=7201513465en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, CKM=7404652809en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9302292-

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