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Article: Imaging the electromechanical activity of the heart in vivo

TitleImaging the electromechanical activity of the heart in vivo
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2011, v. 108 n. 21, p. 8565-8570 How to Cite?
AbstractCardiac conduction abnormalities remain a major cause of death and disability worldwide. However, as of today, there is no standard clinical imaging modality that can noninvasively provide maps of the electrical activation. In this paper, electromechanical wave imaging (EWI), a novel ultrasound-based imaging method, is shown to be capable of mapping the electromechanics of all four cardiac chambers at high temporal and spatial resolutions and a precision previously unobtainable in a full cardiac view in both animals and humans. The transient deformations resulting from the electrical activation of the myocardium were mapped in 2D and combined in 3D biplane ventricular views. EWI maps were acquired during five distinct conduction configurations and were found to be closely correlated to the electrical activation sequences. EWI in humans was shown to be feasible and capable of depicting the normal electromechanical activation sequence of both atria and ventricles. This validation of EWI as a direct, noninvasive, and highly translational approach underlines its potential to serve as a unique imaging tool for the early detection, diagnosis, and treatment monitoring of arrhythmias through ultrasoundbased mapping of the transmural electromechanical activation sequence reliably at the point of care, and in real time.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167062
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorProvost, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, WNen_US
dc.contributor.authorFujikura, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorKonofagou, EEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:02:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:02:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2011, v. 108 n. 21, p. 8565-8570en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167062-
dc.description.abstractCardiac conduction abnormalities remain a major cause of death and disability worldwide. However, as of today, there is no standard clinical imaging modality that can noninvasively provide maps of the electrical activation. In this paper, electromechanical wave imaging (EWI), a novel ultrasound-based imaging method, is shown to be capable of mapping the electromechanics of all four cardiac chambers at high temporal and spatial resolutions and a precision previously unobtainable in a full cardiac view in both animals and humans. The transient deformations resulting from the electrical activation of the myocardium were mapped in 2D and combined in 3D biplane ventricular views. EWI maps were acquired during five distinct conduction configurations and were found to be closely correlated to the electrical activation sequences. EWI in humans was shown to be feasible and capable of depicting the normal electromechanical activation sequence of both atria and ventricles. This validation of EWI as a direct, noninvasive, and highly translational approach underlines its potential to serve as a unique imaging tool for the early detection, diagnosis, and treatment monitoring of arrhythmias through ultrasoundbased mapping of the transmural electromechanical activation sequence reliably at the point of care, and in real time.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic Imaging - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshElectrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Conduction System - Physiology - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Ventricles - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Cardiovascularen_US
dc.subject.meshVentricular Functionen_US
dc.titleImaging the electromechanical activity of the heart in vivoen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, WN: wnlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, WN=rp01663en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1011688108en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21571641-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79957777311en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79957777311&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume108en_US
dc.identifier.issue21en_US
dc.identifier.spage8565en_US
dc.identifier.epage8570en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290908000016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridProvost, J=7103236841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, WN=51964186500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFujikura, K=7004375160en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKonofagou, EE=7005877325en_US

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