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Article: The role of the curriculum and other factors in determining the medium- to long-term attitude of the practicing dentist towards life-long learning

TitleThe role of the curriculum and other factors in determining the medium- to long-term attitude of the practicing dentist towards life-long learning
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJE
Citation
European Journal Of Dental Education, 2010, v. 14 n. 2, p. 84-91 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To investigate the significance of the undergraduate dental curriculum on the medium- to long-term attitudes of the clinician to life-long learning, and to identify demographical and professional characteristics which may influence this attitude. Methods: A specially designed questionnaire targeted 12 cohorts of dentists who qualified from Dublin Dental School and Hospital between 1994 and 2005. The curricula of the cohorts varied from fully didactic, exclusively Problem Based Learning or a hybrid for the oldest, youngest and middle graduates, respectively. Participants were questioned about current professional activities, postgraduate training, practice type, hospital affiliation, use of information services and time dedicated to continuing dental education (CDE), etc. A number of dental scenarios were proposed to determine if participants were adherent to current clinical guidelines. Additionally, a visual analogue scale assessed the overall satisfaction of dentists with their undergraduate programme and determined their opinion regarding its influence on subsequent ability to practice dentistry and keep up-to-date with scientific developments. Results: Contingency analysis of the association between curriculum and continuous educational data did not produce statistical significance. Dentists who work in a hospital environment spend more time on CDE (X 2, Pearson's, P = 0.001), are more adherent to current guidelines (X 2, Pearson's, P = 0.005) and found their undergraduate studies more enjoyable (Wilkoxon/Kruskal-Wallis, P = 0.01). Conclusions: Undergraduate curriculum type was found to have very little or no effect on the graduate's attitude towards life-long learning or confidence in their ability to practice dentistry. However, these attitudes did appear to be influenced by certain family, demographical and professional characteristics. © 2010 John Wiley and Sons A/S.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167042
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.784
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.524
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPolyzois, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorClaffey, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorAttström, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorMattheos, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:02:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:02:08Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Dental Education, 2010, v. 14 n. 2, p. 84-91en_US
dc.identifier.issn1396-5883en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167042-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To investigate the significance of the undergraduate dental curriculum on the medium- to long-term attitudes of the clinician to life-long learning, and to identify demographical and professional characteristics which may influence this attitude. Methods: A specially designed questionnaire targeted 12 cohorts of dentists who qualified from Dublin Dental School and Hospital between 1994 and 2005. The curricula of the cohorts varied from fully didactic, exclusively Problem Based Learning or a hybrid for the oldest, youngest and middle graduates, respectively. Participants were questioned about current professional activities, postgraduate training, practice type, hospital affiliation, use of information services and time dedicated to continuing dental education (CDE), etc. A number of dental scenarios were proposed to determine if participants were adherent to current clinical guidelines. Additionally, a visual analogue scale assessed the overall satisfaction of dentists with their undergraduate programme and determined their opinion regarding its influence on subsequent ability to practice dentistry and keep up-to-date with scientific developments. Results: Contingency analysis of the association between curriculum and continuous educational data did not produce statistical significance. Dentists who work in a hospital environment spend more time on CDE (X 2, Pearson's, P = 0.001), are more adherent to current guidelines (X 2, Pearson's, P = 0.005) and found their undergraduate studies more enjoyable (Wilkoxon/Kruskal-Wallis, P = 0.01). Conclusions: Undergraduate curriculum type was found to have very little or no effect on the graduate's attitude towards life-long learning or confidence in their ability to practice dentistry. However, these attitudes did appear to be influenced by certain family, demographical and professional characteristics. © 2010 John Wiley and Sons A/S.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Dental Educationen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude Of Health Personnelen_US
dc.subject.meshClinical Competenceen_US
dc.subject.meshCurriculumen_US
dc.subject.meshDentists - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Dental - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Dental, Continuingen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLikelihood Functionsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshProblem-Based Learningen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacyen_US
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametricen_US
dc.subject.meshTeaching - Methodsen_US
dc.titleThe role of the curriculum and other factors in determining the medium- to long-term attitude of the practicing dentist towards life-long learningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMattheos, N: mattheos@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMattheos, N=rp01662en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0579.2009.00595.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid20522107-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953172926en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953172926&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage84en_US
dc.identifier.epage91en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276603300004-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPolyzois, I=23135845900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridClaffey, N=7003866539en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAttström, R=7005222726en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKelly, A=34880390300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMattheos, N=6602862633en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike7036049-

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