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Article: Problem-based learning in academic health education. A systematic literature review

TitleProblem-based learning in academic health education. A systematic literature review
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJE
Citation
European Journal Of Dental Education, 2010, v. 14 n. 1, p. 55-64 How to Cite?
AbstractProblem based learning (PBL) arguably represents the most significant development in education over the past five decades. It has been promoted as the curriculum of choice, and since its introduction in the 1960's, has been widely adopted by many medical and dental schools. PBL has been the subject of much published literature but ironically, very little high quality evidence exists to advocate its efficacy and subsequently justify the widespread curriculum change. The purpose of this review is to classify and interpret the available evidence and extract relevant conclusions. In addition, it is the intent to propose recommendations regarding the relative benefits of PBL compared with conventional teaching. The literature was searched using PubMed, ERIC and PsycLIT. Further articles were retrieved from the reference lists of selected papers. Articles were chosen and included according to specific selection criteria. Studies were further classified as randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or comparative studies. These studies were then analysed according to intervention type: whole curricula comparisons and single educational interventions of shorter duration. At the level of RCTs and comparative studies (whole curricula), no clear difference was observed between PBL and conventional teaching. Paradoxically, it was only comparative studies of single PBL intervention in a traditional curriculum that yielded results that were consistently in favour of PBL. Further research is needed to investigate the possibility that multiple PBL interventions in a traditional curriculum could be more effective than an exclusively PBL programme. In addition, it is important to address the potential benefits of PBL in relation to life-long learning of health care professionals. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167039
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.784
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.524
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPolyzois, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorClaffey, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorMattheos, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:02:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:02:06Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Dental Education, 2010, v. 14 n. 1, p. 55-64en_US
dc.identifier.issn1396-5883en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167039-
dc.description.abstractProblem based learning (PBL) arguably represents the most significant development in education over the past five decades. It has been promoted as the curriculum of choice, and since its introduction in the 1960's, has been widely adopted by many medical and dental schools. PBL has been the subject of much published literature but ironically, very little high quality evidence exists to advocate its efficacy and subsequently justify the widespread curriculum change. The purpose of this review is to classify and interpret the available evidence and extract relevant conclusions. In addition, it is the intent to propose recommendations regarding the relative benefits of PBL compared with conventional teaching. The literature was searched using PubMed, ERIC and PsycLIT. Further articles were retrieved from the reference lists of selected papers. Articles were chosen and included according to specific selection criteria. Studies were further classified as randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or comparative studies. These studies were then analysed according to intervention type: whole curricula comparisons and single educational interventions of shorter duration. At the level of RCTs and comparative studies (whole curricula), no clear difference was observed between PBL and conventional teaching. Paradoxically, it was only comparative studies of single PBL intervention in a traditional curriculum that yielded results that were consistently in favour of PBL. Further research is needed to investigate the possibility that multiple PBL interventions in a traditional curriculum could be more effective than an exclusively PBL programme. In addition, it is important to address the potential benefits of PBL in relation to life-long learning of health care professionals. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Dental Educationen_US
dc.subject.meshClinical Competenceen_US
dc.subject.meshCurriculumen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Professionalen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshProblem-Based Learningen_US
dc.subject.meshRandomized Controlled Trials As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshTeaching - Methodsen_US
dc.titleProblem-based learning in academic health education. A systematic literature reviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMattheos, N: mattheos@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMattheos, N=rp01662en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0579.2009.00593.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid20070800-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-74049144541en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-74049144541&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage55en_US
dc.identifier.epage64en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273454500009-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPolyzois, I=23135845900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridClaffey, N=7003866539en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMattheos, N=6602862633en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike6536878-

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