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Conference Paper: The effect of goalkeepers adopting Muller-Lyer postures

TitleThe effect of goalkeepers adopting Muller-Lyer postures
Free Communications - Verbal and Poster: Motor Development, Motor Learning and Control, and Sport and Exercise Psychology
Authors
KeywordsPsychology sports and games medical sciences
Sports medicine
Issue Date2010
PublisherHuman Kinetics.
Citation
The 2010 Conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA 2010), Tucson, AZ., 10-12 June 2010. In Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2010, v. 32 suppl., p. S128 How to Cite?
AbstractThe posture that a goalkeeper assumes can influence perceptions of his or her size and the motor behavior of an opponent. Van der Kamp & Masters (2008) showed that postures that mimicked an amputated Muller-Lyer illusion in a wings-out/arms-up configuration resulted in larger estimates of goalkeeper height than a wings-in/arms-down configuration. Furthermore, when participants threw to score in a handball goal, the shots were placed further from the arms-up goalkeeper, presumably because he was thought capable of covering a greater area of the goal. We aimed to verify that throwing behaviour was related to (mis-)perceptions of goalkeeper height and, by association, goalkeeper reach. A 1.9 m animated representation of a goalkeeper was projected onto a blank screen. The goalkeeper was shown in an arms-up (45 degrees above horizontal), arms-out (horizontal), or arms-down (45 degrees below horizontal) posture. The 3 postures were each shown 10 times in a random order. For each presentation 34 participants made two estimates of the goalkeeper’s maximum static reach, which was defined as the position of middle finger of the goalkeeper in the arms-out posture. Estimates were made by aiming a laser pointer and throwing a ball. The horizontal displacements of the aiming and throwing estimates from the actual position of middle finger (75 cm from the midline of the body) were measured. For the horizontal displacement measure, there was no significant difference between aiming and throwing estimates (p > .05), but a significant effect of posture, F(2, 66) = 10.1, p <.01. Participants perceived the hand closer to the midline of the body in the arms-down posture (67.4 cm) than the arms-up posture (75.2 cm). The findings corroborate previous work in suggesting that the goalkeeper can influence perceptions of his maximum reach and the motor behaviour of an opponent by adopting illusory postures. Further investigations need to address whether the effects are also mediated by hand position or perceptions of arm length rather than body height.
DescriptionPoster 5 - Motor Control: Neural Correlates/Sensorimotor/Motor Practice and Observation: no. 57
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166282
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.379
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.237

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShim, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoolton, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorvan der Kamp, GJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:31:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:31:19Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2010 Conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA 2010), Tucson, AZ., 10-12 June 2010. In Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2010, v. 32 suppl., p. S128en_US
dc.identifier.issn0895-2779-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166282-
dc.descriptionPoster 5 - Motor Control: Neural Correlates/Sensorimotor/Motor Practice and Observation: no. 57-
dc.description.abstractThe posture that a goalkeeper assumes can influence perceptions of his or her size and the motor behavior of an opponent. Van der Kamp & Masters (2008) showed that postures that mimicked an amputated Muller-Lyer illusion in a wings-out/arms-up configuration resulted in larger estimates of goalkeeper height than a wings-in/arms-down configuration. Furthermore, when participants threw to score in a handball goal, the shots were placed further from the arms-up goalkeeper, presumably because he was thought capable of covering a greater area of the goal. We aimed to verify that throwing behaviour was related to (mis-)perceptions of goalkeeper height and, by association, goalkeeper reach. A 1.9 m animated representation of a goalkeeper was projected onto a blank screen. The goalkeeper was shown in an arms-up (45 degrees above horizontal), arms-out (horizontal), or arms-down (45 degrees below horizontal) posture. The 3 postures were each shown 10 times in a random order. For each presentation 34 participants made two estimates of the goalkeeper’s maximum static reach, which was defined as the position of middle finger of the goalkeeper in the arms-out posture. Estimates were made by aiming a laser pointer and throwing a ball. The horizontal displacements of the aiming and throwing estimates from the actual position of middle finger (75 cm from the midline of the body) were measured. For the horizontal displacement measure, there was no significant difference between aiming and throwing estimates (p > .05), but a significant effect of posture, F(2, 66) = 10.1, p <.01. Participants perceived the hand closer to the midline of the body in the arms-down posture (67.4 cm) than the arms-up posture (75.2 cm). The findings corroborate previous work in suggesting that the goalkeeper can influence perceptions of his maximum reach and the motor behaviour of an opponent by adopting illusory postures. Further investigations need to address whether the effects are also mediated by hand position or perceptions of arm length rather than body height.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics.-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPsychology sports and games medical sciences-
dc.subjectSports medicine-
dc.titleThe effect of goalkeepers adopting Muller-Lyer posturesen_US
dc.titleFree Communications - Verbal and Poster: Motor Development, Motor Learning and Control, and Sport and Exercise Psychology-
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailShim, J: jshim@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPoolton, JM: jamiep@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailvan der Kamp, GJ: jvdkamp@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPoolton, JM=rp00949en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros181735en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros208014-
dc.identifier.volume32en_US
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.-
dc.identifier.spageS128en_US
dc.identifier.epageS128en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.description.otherThe 2010 Conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA 2010), Tucson, AZ., 10-12 June 2010. In Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2010, v. 32 suppl., p. S128-

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