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Book Chapter: Thinking styles, culture, and economy : comparing Tibetan minority students with Han Chinese majority students

TitleThinking styles, culture, and economy : comparing Tibetan minority students with Han Chinese majority students
Authors
KeywordsAcculturation -- China, Northwest.
Minority college students -- China, Northwest.
Issue Date2012
PublisherEmerald Press
Citation
Thinking styles, culture, and economy : comparing Tibetan minority students with Han Chinese majority students. In Allen, WR ... (Eds.)(et al), As the world turns : implications of global shifts in higher education for theory, research and practice, p. 239-260. Bingley: Emerald Press, 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study was to ascertain the validity of Sternberg's theory of mental self-government for Tibetan ethnic minority university students and to compare the thinking styles of Tibetan students with those of the Han Chinese majority students. Participants were 408 Tibetan students and 920 Han Chinese students. Furthermore, focus group interviews were conducted with two Tibetan scholars and 11 Tibetan students. Results indicated that compared with the Han students, Tibetan students scored significantly higher on the more norm-conforming thinking styles but significantly lower on the creativity-generating styles. Moreover, Tibetan students indicated a stronger preference for working with others as opposed to working independently. Discussions of these findings focus on the impact of Tibet's culture and economy upon students' thinking styles.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165989
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, LFen_US
dc.contributor.authorPostiglione, GAen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiao, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:26:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:26:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThinking styles, culture, and economy : comparing Tibetan minority students with Han Chinese majority students. In Allen, WR ... (Eds.)(et al), As the world turns : implications of global shifts in higher education for theory, research and practice, p. 239-260. Bingley: Emerald Press, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781780526409-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165989-
dc.description.abstractThis study was to ascertain the validity of Sternberg's theory of mental self-government for Tibetan ethnic minority university students and to compare the thinking styles of Tibetan students with those of the Han Chinese majority students. Participants were 408 Tibetan students and 920 Han Chinese students. Furthermore, focus group interviews were conducted with two Tibetan scholars and 11 Tibetan students. Results indicated that compared with the Han students, Tibetan students scored significantly higher on the more norm-conforming thinking styles but significantly lower on the creativity-generating styles. Moreover, Tibetan students indicated a stronger preference for working with others as opposed to working independently. Discussions of these findings focus on the impact of Tibet's culture and economy upon students' thinking styles.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAs the world turns : implications of global shifts in higher education for theory, research and practiceen_US
dc.subjectAcculturation -- China, Northwest.-
dc.subjectMinority college students -- China, Northwest.-
dc.titleThinking styles, culture, and economy : comparing Tibetan minority students with Han Chinese majority studentsen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, LF: lfzhang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPostiglione, GA: gerry@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, LF=rp00988en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPostiglione, GA=rp00951en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros206167en_US
dc.identifier.spage239-
dc.identifier.epage260-
dc.publisher.placeBingley-
dc.customcontrol.immutableyiu 130924-

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