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Article: Fishing groupers towards extinction: A global assessment of threats and extinction risks in a billion dollar fishery

TitleFishing groupers towards extinction: A global assessment of threats and extinction risks in a billion dollar fishery
Authors
KeywordsEpinephelidae
IUCN Red List
Marine biodiversity
Marine extinction
Overfishing
Population decline
Issue Date2013
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAF
Citation
Fish And Fisheries, 2013, v. 14 n. 2, p. 119-136 How to Cite?
AbstractGroupers are a valuable fishery resource of reef ecosystems and are among those species most vulnerable to fishing pressure because of life history characteristics including longevity, late sexual maturation and aggregation spawning. Despite their economic importance, few grouper fisheries are regularly monitored or managed at the species level, and many are reported to be undergoing declines. To identify major threats to groupers, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List criteria were applied to all 163 species. Red List assessments show that 20 species (12%) risk extinction if current trends continue, and an additional 22 species (13%) are considered to be Near Threatened. The Caribbean Sea, coastal Brazil and Southeast Asia contain a disproportionate number of Threatened species, while numerous poorly documented and Near Threatened species occur in many regions. In all, 30% of all species are considered to be Data Deficient. Given that the major threat is overfishing, accompanied by a general absence and/or poor application of fishery management, the prognosis for restoration and successful conservation of Threatened species is poor. We believe that few refuges remain for recovery and that key biological processes (e.g. spawning aggregations) continue to be compromised by uncontrolled fishing. Mariculture, through hatchery-rearing, increases production of a few species and contributes to satisfying high market demand, but many such operations depend heavily on wild-caught juveniles with resultant growth and recruitment overfishing. Better management of fishing and other conservation efforts are urgently needed, and we provide examples of possible actions and constraints. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165987
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.521
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.751
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSadovy de Mitcheson, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCraig, MTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBertoncini, AAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, KEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, WWLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChoat, JHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCornish, ASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFennessy, STen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, BPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHeemstra, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorMyers, RFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPollard, DAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRhodes, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRocha, LAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRussell, BCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamoilys, MAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSanciangco, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:26:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:26:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFish And Fisheries, 2013, v. 14 n. 2, p. 119-136en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1467-2960en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165987-
dc.description.abstractGroupers are a valuable fishery resource of reef ecosystems and are among those species most vulnerable to fishing pressure because of life history characteristics including longevity, late sexual maturation and aggregation spawning. Despite their economic importance, few grouper fisheries are regularly monitored or managed at the species level, and many are reported to be undergoing declines. To identify major threats to groupers, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List criteria were applied to all 163 species. Red List assessments show that 20 species (12%) risk extinction if current trends continue, and an additional 22 species (13%) are considered to be Near Threatened. The Caribbean Sea, coastal Brazil and Southeast Asia contain a disproportionate number of Threatened species, while numerous poorly documented and Near Threatened species occur in many regions. In all, 30% of all species are considered to be Data Deficient. Given that the major threat is overfishing, accompanied by a general absence and/or poor application of fishery management, the prognosis for restoration and successful conservation of Threatened species is poor. We believe that few refuges remain for recovery and that key biological processes (e.g. spawning aggregations) continue to be compromised by uncontrolled fishing. Mariculture, through hatchery-rearing, increases production of a few species and contributes to satisfying high market demand, but many such operations depend heavily on wild-caught juveniles with resultant growth and recruitment overfishing. Better management of fishing and other conservation efforts are urgently needed, and we provide examples of possible actions and constraints. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAFen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFish and Fisheriesen_HK
dc.subjectEpinephelidaeen_HK
dc.subjectIUCN Red Listen_HK
dc.subjectMarine biodiversityen_HK
dc.subjectMarine extinctionen_HK
dc.subjectOverfishingen_HK
dc.subjectPopulation declineen_HK
dc.titleFishing groupers towards extinction: A global assessment of threats and extinction risks in a billion dollar fisheryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSadovy de Mitcheson, Y: yjsadovy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySadovy de Mitcheson, Y=rp00773en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-2979.2011.00455.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876338321en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros211178en_US
dc.identifier.spage119en_US
dc.identifier.epage136en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1467-2979-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000317854300001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSadovy de Mitcheson, Y=6603830002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCraig, MT=7103269715en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBertoncini, AA=16021568600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCarpenter, KE=7202705899en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, WWL=8343243600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoat, JH=6701828837en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCornish, AS=7006637048en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFennessy, ST=6701715977en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFerreira, BP=7007036703en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeemstra, PC=6603107466en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, M=36014543100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMyers, RF=55197247800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPollard, DA=7103394661en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRhodes, KL=16426535600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRocha, LA=7102199515en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRussell, BC=7202346587en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamoilys, MA=6602383081en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSanciangco, J=24482438500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10624699-

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