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Conference Paper: Unraveling the Hong Kong peak tram illusion

TitleUnraveling the Hong Kong peak tram illusion
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
Issue Date2012
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, FL., 11-16 May 2012. In Journal of Vision, 2012, v. 12 n. 9, article 577 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Hong Kong Peak Tram Illusion is the perception of an exaggerated tilt to vertical buildings while ascending or descending Victoria Peak on the Peak Tram in Hong Kong. We have previously reported this effect to be multisensory in origin and based upon the confluence of input from positional, visual, and passive motion cues. We elaborate upon earlier investigations by introducing new apparatus to isolate contributions to the effect from three sensory modalities: vision, proprioception, and the vestibular system. Using a new tilt-matching task, four observers chose the tilt line which best matched their perceived tilt while the objective slope was simultaneously measured. The use of under-foot, under-buttocks, and behind-back wedges to compensate for body slant and return the torso to true vertical weakened the illusion, but only when used in combination, suggesting that proprioceptive and vestibular systems are co-dependent in their contribution to the effect. Perception of the illusion is further lessened by standing, which eliminates bodily cues and requires active balancing. Removal of some visual cues, such as the rod-and-frame effect, by use of a viewing box weakened the illusion independently of objective slope. Individual differences in observer data suggest variations in the way sensory information is integrated. Further investigation into causes of the effect will involve elimination of confounding visual factors, comparison of observations of particular stimuli, and may be facilitated by an offsite simulation of the illusion. The Hong Kong Peak Tram Illusion is a real-life phenomenon which strikingly reveals how the labyrinthine complexity of sensory integration may lead to a dramatic misperception of the world when conflicting cues interact.
DescriptionThis journal issue contain abstracts of the 13th VSS Annual Meeting 2012
Open Access Journal
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165719
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOxner, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, HMen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpillmann, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorTseng, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:22:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:22:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, FL., 11-16 May 2012. In Journal of Vision, 2012, v. 12 n. 9, article 577en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165719-
dc.descriptionThis journal issue contain abstracts of the 13th VSS Annual Meeting 2012-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.description.abstractThe Hong Kong Peak Tram Illusion is the perception of an exaggerated tilt to vertical buildings while ascending or descending Victoria Peak on the Peak Tram in Hong Kong. We have previously reported this effect to be multisensory in origin and based upon the confluence of input from positional, visual, and passive motion cues. We elaborate upon earlier investigations by introducing new apparatus to isolate contributions to the effect from three sensory modalities: vision, proprioception, and the vestibular system. Using a new tilt-matching task, four observers chose the tilt line which best matched their perceived tilt while the objective slope was simultaneously measured. The use of under-foot, under-buttocks, and behind-back wedges to compensate for body slant and return the torso to true vertical weakened the illusion, but only when used in combination, suggesting that proprioceptive and vestibular systems are co-dependent in their contribution to the effect. Perception of the illusion is further lessened by standing, which eliminates bodily cues and requires active balancing. Removal of some visual cues, such as the rod-and-frame effect, by use of a viewing box weakened the illusion independently of objective slope. Individual differences in observer data suggest variations in the way sensory information is integrated. Further investigation into causes of the effect will involve elimination of confounding visual factors, comparison of observations of particular stimuli, and may be facilitated by an offsite simulation of the illusion. The Hong Kong Peak Tram Illusion is a real-life phenomenon which strikingly reveals how the labyrinthine complexity of sensory integration may lead to a dramatic misperception of the world when conflicting cues interact.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry-
dc.titleUnraveling the Hong Kong peak tram illusionen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailOxner, M: oxner@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChow, HM: dorischm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTseng, C: tseng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, C=rp00640en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/12.9.577-
dc.identifier.hkuros209106en_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130510-

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