File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Fundamental movement skills and physical activity among children with and without cerebral palsy
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleFundamental movement skills and physical activity among children with and without cerebral palsy
 
AuthorsCapio, CM2 4
Sit, CHP2 3
Abernethy, B2 1
Masters, RSW2
 
KeywordsCerebral palsy
Locomotor skills
Object control skills
Physical activity
Sedentary behavior
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/redevdis
 
CitationResearch In Developmental Disabilities, 2012, v. 33 n. 4, p. 1235-1241 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2012.02.020
 
AbstractFundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency is believed to influence children's physical activity (PA), with those more proficient tending to be more active. Children with cerebral palsy (CP), who represent the largest diagnostic group treated in pediatric rehabilitation, have been found to be less active than typically developing children. This study examined the association of FMS proficiency with PA in a group of children with CP, and compared the data with a group of typically developing children. Five FMS (run, jump, kick, throw, catch) were tested using process- and product-oriented measures, and accelerometers were used to monitor PA over a 7-day period. The results showed that children with CP spent less time in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), but more time in sedentary behavior than typically developing children. FMS proficiency was negatively associated with sedentary time and positively associated with time spent in MVPA in both groups of children. Process-oriented FMS measures (movement patterns) were found to have a stronger influence on PA in children with CP than in typically developing children. The findings provide evidence that FMS proficiency facilitates activity accrual among children with CP, suggesting that rehabilitation and physical education programs that support FMS development may contribute to PA-related health benefits. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN0891-4222
2012 Impact Factor: 2.483
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.749
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2012.02.020
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCapio, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorSit, CHP
 
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, B
 
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSW
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:11:55Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:11:55Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractFundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency is believed to influence children's physical activity (PA), with those more proficient tending to be more active. Children with cerebral palsy (CP), who represent the largest diagnostic group treated in pediatric rehabilitation, have been found to be less active than typically developing children. This study examined the association of FMS proficiency with PA in a group of children with CP, and compared the data with a group of typically developing children. Five FMS (run, jump, kick, throw, catch) were tested using process- and product-oriented measures, and accelerometers were used to monitor PA over a 7-day period. The results showed that children with CP spent less time in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), but more time in sedentary behavior than typically developing children. FMS proficiency was negatively associated with sedentary time and positively associated with time spent in MVPA in both groups of children. Process-oriented FMS measures (movement patterns) were found to have a stronger influence on PA in children with CP than in typically developing children. The findings provide evidence that FMS proficiency facilitates activity accrual among children with CP, suggesting that rehabilitation and physical education programs that support FMS development may contribute to PA-related health benefits. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationResearch In Developmental Disabilities, 2012, v. 33 n. 4, p. 1235-1241 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2012.02.020
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10487712
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2012.02.020
 
dc.identifier.epage1241
 
dc.identifier.hkuros207961
 
dc.identifier.issn0891-4222
2012 Impact Factor: 2.483
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.749
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.pmid22502850
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858730252
 
dc.identifier.spage1235
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164890
 
dc.identifier.volume33
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/redevdis
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofResearch in Developmental Disabilities
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshActigraphy
 
dc.subject.meshCerebral Palsy - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshChild
 
dc.subject.meshChild Development - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
 
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshKinetocardiography
 
dc.subject.meshMotor Activity - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshMotor Skills - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshMovement - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshSedentary Lifestyle
 
dc.subjectCerebral palsy
 
dc.subjectLocomotor skills
 
dc.subjectObject control skills
 
dc.subjectPhysical activity
 
dc.subjectSedentary behavior
 
dc.titleFundamental movement skills and physical activity among children with and without cerebral palsy
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Capio, CM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sit, CHP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Abernethy, B</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Masters, RSW</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-09-20T08:11:55Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-09-20T08:11:55Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Research In Developmental Disabilities, 2012, v. 33 n. 4, p. 1235-1241</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0891-4222</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/164890</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Fundamental movement skills (FMS) proficiency is believed to influence children&apos;s physical activity (PA), with those more proficient tending to be more active. Children with cerebral palsy (CP), who represent the largest diagnostic group treated in pediatric rehabilitation, have been found to be less active than typically developing children. This study examined the association of FMS proficiency with PA in a group of children with CP, and compared the data with a group of typically developing children. Five FMS (run, jump, kick, throw, catch) were tested using process- and product-oriented measures, and accelerometers were used to monitor PA over a 7-day period. The results showed that children with CP spent less time in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), but more time in sedentary behavior than typically developing children. FMS proficiency was negatively associated with sedentary time and positively associated with time spent in MVPA in both groups of children. Process-oriented FMS measures (movement patterns) were found to have a stronger influence on PA in children with CP than in typically developing children. The findings provide evidence that FMS proficiency facilitates activity accrual among children with CP, suggesting that rehabilitation and physical education programs that support FMS development may contribute to PA-related health benefits. &#169; 2012 Elsevier Ltd.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Pergamon. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/redevdis</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Research in Developmental Disabilities</relation.ispartof>
<subject>Cerebral palsy</subject>
<subject>Locomotor skills</subject>
<subject>Object control skills</subject>
<subject>Physical activity</subject>
<subject>Sedentary behavior</subject>
<subject.mesh>Actigraphy</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Cerebral Palsy - physiopathology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Child</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Child Development - physiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Child, Preschool</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Cross-Sectional Studies</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Kinetocardiography</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Motor Activity - physiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Motor Skills - physiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Movement - physiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Sedentary Lifestyle</subject.mesh>
<title>Fundamental movement skills and physical activity among children with and without cerebral palsy</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1016/j.ridd.2012.02.020</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>22502850</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-84858730252</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>207961</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84858730252&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>33</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>4</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>1235</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>1241</identifier.epage>
<publisher.place>United Kingdom</publisher.place>
<identifier.citeulike>10487712</identifier.citeulike>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. University of Queensland
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Chinese University of Hong Kong
  4. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven