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Article: Past dust and GAS/FUME exposure and COPD in Chinese: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
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TitlePast dust and GAS/FUME exposure and COPD in Chinese: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
 
AuthorsLam, KBH4
Yin, P2 4
Jiang, CQ3
Zhang, WS3
Adab, P4
Miller, MR4
Thomas, GN4
Ayres, JG4
Lam, TH1
Cheng, KK4
 
KeywordsChinese
Chronic obstructive lung disease
Coughing
Dust exposure
Dyspnea
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rmed
 
CitationRespiratory Medicine, 2012, v. 106 n. 10, p. 1421-1428 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2012.05.009
 
AbstractThe impact of occupational dust and gas/fume exposure on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in developing countries has not been quantified. We examined the relationship between past dust and fume exposure and prevalence of COPD and respiratory symptoms in a cross-sectional analysis of a large Chinese population sample. Participants in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (n = 8216; 27.3% men, mean age 61.9 +/- 6.8 years) had spirometry and a structured interview including exposures, symptoms, and lifestyle. Self-reported intensity and duration of dust and gas/fume exposure was used to derive cumulative exposure. COPD was diagnosed from spirometry using lower limit of normal based on prediction equations. COPD was associated with high exposure to dust or gas/fume (exposed: 87/1206 v non-exposed: 191/3853; adjusted odds ratio: 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06, 1.87) with no evidence of effect modification by smoking. Respiratory symptoms were associated with exposures to dust and gas/fume, with adjusted odds ratios for chronic cough/phlegm of 1.57 (1.13, 2.17) and 1.39 (1.20, 1.60) for dyspnoea. The overall population attributable fraction for COPD due to occupational exposure was 10.4% (95% CI -0.9%, 19.5%). Occupational dust and gas/fume exposure is associated with an increased prevalence of COPD in this Chinese sample, independent of smoking. The population attributable fraction in Chinese is similar to that in Western populations.
 
ISSN0954-6111
2013 Impact Factor: 2.917
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2012.05.009
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000309147400010
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, KBH
 
dc.contributor.authorYin, P
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorAdab, P
 
dc.contributor.authorMiller, MR
 
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GN
 
dc.contributor.authorAyres, JG
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:09:42Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:09:42Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThe impact of occupational dust and gas/fume exposure on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in developing countries has not been quantified. We examined the relationship between past dust and fume exposure and prevalence of COPD and respiratory symptoms in a cross-sectional analysis of a large Chinese population sample. Participants in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (n = 8216; 27.3% men, mean age 61.9 +/- 6.8 years) had spirometry and a structured interview including exposures, symptoms, and lifestyle. Self-reported intensity and duration of dust and gas/fume exposure was used to derive cumulative exposure. COPD was diagnosed from spirometry using lower limit of normal based on prediction equations. COPD was associated with high exposure to dust or gas/fume (exposed: 87/1206 v non-exposed: 191/3853; adjusted odds ratio: 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06, 1.87) with no evidence of effect modification by smoking. Respiratory symptoms were associated with exposures to dust and gas/fume, with adjusted odds ratios for chronic cough/phlegm of 1.57 (1.13, 2.17) and 1.39 (1.20, 1.60) for dyspnoea. The overall population attributable fraction for COPD due to occupational exposure was 10.4% (95% CI -0.9%, 19.5%). Occupational dust and gas/fume exposure is associated with an increased prevalence of COPD in this Chinese sample, independent of smoking. The population attributable fraction in Chinese is similar to that in Western populations.
 
dc.identifier.citationRespiratory Medicine, 2012, v. 106 n. 10, p. 1421-1428 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2012.05.009
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2012.05.009
 
dc.identifier.epage1428
 
dc.identifier.hkuros209802
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000309147400010
 
dc.identifier.issn0954-6111
2013 Impact Factor: 2.917
 
dc.identifier.issue10
 
dc.identifier.pmid22795505
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865202412
 
dc.identifier.spage1421
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164800
 
dc.identifier.volume106
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rmed
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofRespiratory Medicine
 
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in . Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL#, ISSUE#, (DATE)] DOI#
 
dc.subjectChinese
 
dc.subjectChronic obstructive lung disease
 
dc.subjectCoughing
 
dc.subjectDust exposure
 
dc.subjectDyspnea
 
dc.titlePast dust and GAS/FUME exposure and COPD in Chinese: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Yin, P</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Jiang, CQ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhang, WS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Adab, P</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Miller, MR</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Thomas, GN</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ayres, JG</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, TH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheng, KK</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-09-20T08:09:42Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-09-20T08:09:42Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
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<description.abstract>The impact of occupational dust and gas/fume exposure on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in developing countries has not been quantified. We examined the relationship between past dust and fume exposure and prevalence of COPD and respiratory symptoms in a cross-sectional analysis of a large Chinese population sample. Participants in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (n = 8216; 27.3% men, mean age 61.9 +/- 6.8 years) had spirometry and a structured interview including exposures, symptoms, and lifestyle. Self-reported intensity and duration of dust and gas/fume exposure was used to derive cumulative exposure. COPD was diagnosed from spirometry using lower limit of normal based on prediction equations. COPD was associated with high exposure to dust or gas/fume (exposed: 87/1206 v non-exposed: 191/3853; adjusted odds ratio: 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06, 1.87) with no evidence of effect modification by smoking. Respiratory symptoms were associated with exposures to dust and gas/fume, with adjusted odds ratios for chronic cough/phlegm of 1.57 (1.13, 2.17) and 1.39 (1.20, 1.60) for dyspnoea. The overall population attributable fraction for COPD due to occupational exposure was 10.4% (95% CI -0.9%, 19.5%). Occupational dust and gas/fume exposure is associated with an increased prevalence of COPD in this Chinese sample, independent of smoking. The population attributable fraction in Chinese is similar to that in Western populations.</description.abstract>
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<subject>Chinese</subject>
<subject>Chronic obstructive lung disease</subject>
<subject>Coughing</subject>
<subject>Dust exposure</subject>
<subject>Dyspnea</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
  3. Guangzhou Number 12 People's Hospital
  4. University of Birmingham