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Article: How can stressed employees deliver better customer service? The underlying self-regulation depletion mechanism

TitleHow can stressed employees deliver better customer service? The underlying self-regulation depletion mechanism
Authors
KeywordsComplaint behaviors
Customer service
Extra-role behaviors
Perspective taking
Self-regulation depletion
Supervisory support
Work stress
Issue Date2012
PublisherAmerican Marketing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.marketingpower.com
Citation
Journal Of Marketing, 2012, v. 76 n. 1, p. 119-137 How to Cite?
AbstractThis research delineates and empirically tests how regulatory depletion may affect high-stress employees' service performance on different types of job tasks. Using a laboratory experiment and a survey study, the authors examine (1) whether work stress causes a depletion effect, such that high work stress undermines service employees' performance on tasks requiring self-regulation (e.g., customer complaint handling performance) versus tasks requiring limited self-regulation (e.g., customer-directed extra-role performance); (2) whether the depletion effect can be overcome by supervisory support or employees' engagement in perspective taking; and (3) how these moderating effects might be mediated by employees' feelings of fatigue and intrinsic job motivation. The results confirm regulatory depletion: High-stress employees feel more fatigue and perform more poorly than low-stress employees in tasks requiring self-regulation. However, the depletion effect from work stress is largely attenuated on employees' performance on tasks requiring less or limited self-regulation. The mediated moderation tests further show that the extent of the depletion effect is not uniform. Employees who can replenish their resources from supervisory support or enhance their goal focus by engaging in perspective taking are less affected by regulatory depletion. These buffering effects occur because of enhanced intrinsic job motivation. © 2012, American Marketing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164733
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.885
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.612
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWan, EWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:08:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:08:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Marketing, 2012, v. 76 n. 1, p. 119-137en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-2429en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164733-
dc.description.abstractThis research delineates and empirically tests how regulatory depletion may affect high-stress employees' service performance on different types of job tasks. Using a laboratory experiment and a survey study, the authors examine (1) whether work stress causes a depletion effect, such that high work stress undermines service employees' performance on tasks requiring self-regulation (e.g., customer complaint handling performance) versus tasks requiring limited self-regulation (e.g., customer-directed extra-role performance); (2) whether the depletion effect can be overcome by supervisory support or employees' engagement in perspective taking; and (3) how these moderating effects might be mediated by employees' feelings of fatigue and intrinsic job motivation. The results confirm regulatory depletion: High-stress employees feel more fatigue and perform more poorly than low-stress employees in tasks requiring self-regulation. However, the depletion effect from work stress is largely attenuated on employees' performance on tasks requiring less or limited self-regulation. The mediated moderation tests further show that the extent of the depletion effect is not uniform. Employees who can replenish their resources from supervisory support or enhance their goal focus by engaging in perspective taking are less affected by regulatory depletion. These buffering effects occur because of enhanced intrinsic job motivation. © 2012, American Marketing Association.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Marketing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.marketingpower.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Marketingen_HK
dc.subjectComplaint behaviorsen_HK
dc.subjectCustomer serviceen_HK
dc.subjectExtra-role behaviorsen_HK
dc.subjectPerspective takingen_HK
dc.subjectSelf-regulation depletionen_HK
dc.subjectSupervisory supporten_HK
dc.subjectWork stressen_HK
dc.titleHow can stressed employees deliver better customer service? The underlying self-regulation depletion mechanismen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWan, EW: ewwan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWan, EW=rp01105en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1509/jm.10.0202en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859597883en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros205946en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859597883&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume76en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage119en_HK
dc.identifier.epage137en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1547-7185-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KW=15768882400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, EW=23052867400en_HK

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