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Article: Korean-Chinese parents' language attitudes and additive bilingual education in China

TitleKorean-Chinese parents' language attitudes and additive bilingual education in China
Authors
KeywordsAdditive bilingualism
Affective function
Korean-chinese
Language attitude
Referential function
Issue Date2012
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01434632.asp
Citation
Journal of Multilingual & Multicultural Development, 2012, v. 33 n. 6, p. 539-552 How to Cite?
Abstract
China's diversity of minority groups, marked by many languages and cultures, has led to much push and pull experience between homogenising forces and indigenous cultures. This is apparent in its bilingual education programme for ethnic minorities, among which Korean diaspora communities are to be counted. Korean-Chinese people in China have been exposed to the global evolution from agricultural economy to market-oriented industrial and post-industrial economy. Paradoxically, this globalising societal change has fuelled their ethnic consciousness amidst a process of 'monolingual market economy', where Putonghua is seen as the 'High' language for upward mobility. This paper explores Korean-Chinese parents' attitudes towards Putonghua and the Korean language. Using data from interviews with 27 families in north-east China, it is argued that the more the parents are exposed to the Koreans in the Peninsula, the clearer they realise the importance of Putonghua and Korean, not only affectively, but also referentially in function of a cross-national context. The findings suggest an increasingly complex, non-determinant hierarchy of power built between the dominant language and the non-dominant language, thereby it could be suggested that an additive bilingualism in education is needed in order to cater for referential and affective functions of language. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164687
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 0.541
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.548
ISI Accession Number ID

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGao, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorPark, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:08:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:08:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Multilingual & Multicultural Development, 2012, v. 33 n. 6, p. 539-552en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-4632-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164687-
dc.description.abstractChina's diversity of minority groups, marked by many languages and cultures, has led to much push and pull experience between homogenising forces and indigenous cultures. This is apparent in its bilingual education programme for ethnic minorities, among which Korean diaspora communities are to be counted. Korean-Chinese people in China have been exposed to the global evolution from agricultural economy to market-oriented industrial and post-industrial economy. Paradoxically, this globalising societal change has fuelled their ethnic consciousness amidst a process of 'monolingual market economy', where Putonghua is seen as the 'High' language for upward mobility. This paper explores Korean-Chinese parents' attitudes towards Putonghua and the Korean language. Using data from interviews with 27 families in north-east China, it is argued that the more the parents are exposed to the Koreans in the Peninsula, the clearer they realise the importance of Putonghua and Korean, not only affectively, but also referentially in function of a cross-national context. The findings suggest an increasingly complex, non-determinant hierarchy of power built between the dominant language and the non-dominant language, thereby it could be suggested that an additive bilingualism in education is needed in order to cater for referential and affective functions of language. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01434632.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Multilingual & Multicultural Developmenten_US
dc.subjectAdditive bilingualism-
dc.subjectAffective function-
dc.subjectKorean-chinese-
dc.subjectLanguage attitude-
dc.subjectReferential function-
dc.titleKorean-Chinese parents' language attitudes and additive bilingual education in Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGao, F: gaofang@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPark, J: jaepark@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPark, JH=rp00947en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01434632.2012.692683-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865216137en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros208052en_US
dc.identifier.volume33en_US
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage539en_US
dc.identifier.epage552en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308035800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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