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Article: The use of Mood Disorder Questionnaire Hypomania Checklist-32 and clinical predictors for screening previously unrecognised bipolar disorder in a general psychiatric setting

TitleThe use of Mood Disorder Questionnaire Hypomania Checklist-32 and clinical predictors for screening previously unrecognised bipolar disorder in a general psychiatric setting
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychres
Citation
Psychiatry Research, 2012, v. 195 n. 3, p. 111-117 How to Cite?
AbstractBipolar disorder is often unrecognised and misdiagnosed in the general psychiatric setting. This study compared the psychometric properties of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and the Hypomania Checklist-32 (HCL-32), examined the clinical predictors of bipolar disorder and determined the best approach for screening previously unrecognised bipolar disorder in a general psychiatric clinic. A random sample of 340 non-psychotic outpatients with no previous diagnosis of bipolar disorder completed the MDQ and HCL-32 during their scheduled clinic visits. Mood and alcohol/substance use disorders were reassessed using a telephone-based Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We found that the HCL-32 had better psychometric performance and discriminatory capacity than the MDQ. The HCL-32's internal consistency and 4-week test-retest reliability were higher. The area under the curve was also greater than that of the MDQ at various clustering and impairment criteria. The optimal cut-off of the MDQ was co-occurrence of four symptoms with omission of the impairment criterion; for the HCL-32, it was 11 affirmative responses. Multivariable logistic regression found that bipolar family history was associated with an increased risk of bipolar disorder (odds ratio = 4.93). The study showed that simultaneous use of the HCL-32 and bipolar family history was the best approach for detecting previously unrecognised bipolar disorder. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164547
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.466
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.235
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPoon, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_US
dc.contributor.authorTso, KCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:05:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:05:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychiatry Research, 2012, v. 195 n. 3, p. 111-117en_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-1781-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164547-
dc.description.abstractBipolar disorder is often unrecognised and misdiagnosed in the general psychiatric setting. This study compared the psychometric properties of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and the Hypomania Checklist-32 (HCL-32), examined the clinical predictors of bipolar disorder and determined the best approach for screening previously unrecognised bipolar disorder in a general psychiatric clinic. A random sample of 340 non-psychotic outpatients with no previous diagnosis of bipolar disorder completed the MDQ and HCL-32 during their scheduled clinic visits. Mood and alcohol/substance use disorders were reassessed using a telephone-based Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We found that the HCL-32 had better psychometric performance and discriminatory capacity than the MDQ. The HCL-32's internal consistency and 4-week test-retest reliability were higher. The area under the curve was also greater than that of the MDQ at various clustering and impairment criteria. The optimal cut-off of the MDQ was co-occurrence of four symptoms with omission of the impairment criterion; for the HCL-32, it was 11 affirmative responses. Multivariable logistic regression found that bipolar family history was associated with an increased risk of bipolar disorder (odds ratio = 4.93). The study showed that simultaneous use of the HCL-32 and bipolar family history was the best approach for detecting previously unrecognised bipolar disorder. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychres-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychiatry Researchen_US
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Psychiatry Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Psychiatry Research, 2012, v. 195 n. 3, p. 111-117. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2011.07.014-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshChecklist-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPsychometrics-
dc.titleThe use of Mood Disorder Questionnaire Hypomania Checklist-32 and clinical predictors for screening previously unrecognised bipolar disorder in a general psychiatric settingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychres.2011.07.014-
dc.identifier.pmid21816486-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857646276-
dc.identifier.hkuros206127en_US
dc.identifier.volume195en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage111en_US
dc.identifier.epage117en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000301813400003-
dc.publisher.placeIreland-
dc.identifier.citeulike9623245-

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