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Article: Flow oscillation-a measure to predict the surgery outcome for obstructed sleep apnea (OSA) subject

TitleFlow oscillation-a measure to predict the surgery outcome for obstructed sleep apnea (OSA) subject
Authors
KeywordsCFD simulations
Computational fluid dynamics simulations
Flow oscillations
Inspiratory flow
Intrinsic property
Issue Date2012
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbiomech
Citation
Journal of Biomechanics, 2012, v. 45 n. 13, p. 2284-2288 How to Cite?
AbstractObstructed sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder which may need surgery to widen the airway; however the success rate of surgery is limited. Here we report a finding that could be used to predict the outcome of the OSA surgery. We found that inspiratory flow oscillates due to flow separation near the larynx, and the resulting periodic signal (3-5Hz) is an intrinsic property of breathing. This flow oscillating signal may be the afferent stimulus to trigger respiratory events. It is found that the flow oscillation is attenuated for the OSA subjects. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation reveals that there exists flow separation near larynx and this separation is severely weakened in the OSA upper airway model. It is believed that the flow oscillating signal can serve as the measure to quantify the breathing quality of an OSA subject. This makes it possible to predict the surgery outcome of the OSA subject by applying CFD simulation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164227
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.431
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.233
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorYe, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T07:56:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T07:56:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Biomechanics, 2012, v. 45 n. 13, p. 2284-2288en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9290-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164227-
dc.description.abstractObstructed sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder which may need surgery to widen the airway; however the success rate of surgery is limited. Here we report a finding that could be used to predict the outcome of the OSA surgery. We found that inspiratory flow oscillates due to flow separation near the larynx, and the resulting periodic signal (3-5Hz) is an intrinsic property of breathing. This flow oscillating signal may be the afferent stimulus to trigger respiratory events. It is found that the flow oscillation is attenuated for the OSA subjects. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation reveals that there exists flow separation near larynx and this separation is severely weakened in the OSA upper airway model. It is believed that the flow oscillating signal can serve as the measure to quantify the breathing quality of an OSA subject. This makes it possible to predict the surgery outcome of the OSA subject by applying CFD simulation.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbiomechen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biomechanicsen_US
dc.subjectCFD simulations-
dc.subjectComputational fluid dynamics simulations-
dc.subjectFlow oscillations-
dc.subjectInspiratory flow-
dc.subjectIntrinsic property-
dc.titleFlow oscillation-a measure to predict the surgery outcome for obstructed sleep apnea (OSA) subjecten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, L: lixi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHuang, L=rp00119en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jbiomech.2012.05.050-
dc.identifier.pmid22857945-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865162912-
dc.identifier.hkuros208382en_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue13-
dc.identifier.spage2284en_US
dc.identifier.epage2288en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308854400015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.citeulike11150061-

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