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Article: Exotic plant invasion in the highly degraded upland landscape of Hong Kong, China

TitleExotic plant invasion in the highly degraded upland landscape of Hong Kong, China
Authors
KeywordsAlien plants
Invasive species
Roadside
Stream
Syzygium jambos
Tropical Asia
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0960-3115
Citation
Biodiversity And Conservation, 2009, v. 18 n. 1, p. 191-202 How to Cite?
AbstractPlant communities in the continental tropics have suffered less from exotic plant invasions than their oceanic island counterparts. Most studies have focused on near-pristine communities. By contrast, we examine the resistance of semi-natural continental plant communities in Hong Kong, which have been suffering from chronic and massive human impacts. We compiled a list of all naturalized non-native species recorded in Hong Kong and then sampled the plant communities for exotic species along roadsides, a stream through semi-natural vegetation, and in semi-natural vegetation away from both roads and streams on Tai Mo Shan, Hong Kong's highest peak (957 m). Similar surveys were repeated in other areas of Hong Kong. More than 162 naturalized exotic plant species have been recorded in Hong Kong. On Tai Mo Shan, 29 exotic species were recorded in roadside vegetation, with the diversity but not percentage cover declining significantly with altitude. Fifteen exotic species were found along the stream, including two not found along the roadside. Only six exotic species were found away from roads and streams, all in unshaded areas disturbed by feral cattle. In all surveys, no exotics were found in closed woody vegetation or in open areas without feral cattle, except for one species. The shade-tolerant tropical Asian tree Syzygium jambos was found invading along some streamsides without anthropogenic disturbance. Despite centuries of massive human impacts, exotic plant invasions in Hong Kong are still largely confined to habitats that suffer from chronic human disturbance. Feral cattle promote invasion where people are absent, but this problem still seems potentially reversible. Only Syzygium jambos is of possible current conservation concern. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163966
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.258
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.248
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GPCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHau, BCHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCorlett, RTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T07:54:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T07:54:10Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiodiversity And Conservation, 2009, v. 18 n. 1, p. 191-202en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0960-3115en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163966-
dc.description.abstractPlant communities in the continental tropics have suffered less from exotic plant invasions than their oceanic island counterparts. Most studies have focused on near-pristine communities. By contrast, we examine the resistance of semi-natural continental plant communities in Hong Kong, which have been suffering from chronic and massive human impacts. We compiled a list of all naturalized non-native species recorded in Hong Kong and then sampled the plant communities for exotic species along roadsides, a stream through semi-natural vegetation, and in semi-natural vegetation away from both roads and streams on Tai Mo Shan, Hong Kong's highest peak (957 m). Similar surveys were repeated in other areas of Hong Kong. More than 162 naturalized exotic plant species have been recorded in Hong Kong. On Tai Mo Shan, 29 exotic species were recorded in roadside vegetation, with the diversity but not percentage cover declining significantly with altitude. Fifteen exotic species were found along the stream, including two not found along the roadside. Only six exotic species were found away from roads and streams, all in unshaded areas disturbed by feral cattle. In all surveys, no exotics were found in closed woody vegetation or in open areas without feral cattle, except for one species. The shade-tolerant tropical Asian tree Syzygium jambos was found invading along some streamsides without anthropogenic disturbance. Despite centuries of massive human impacts, exotic plant invasions in Hong Kong are still largely confined to habitats that suffer from chronic human disturbance. Feral cattle promote invasion where people are absent, but this problem still seems potentially reversible. Only Syzygium jambos is of possible current conservation concern. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0960-3115en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiodiversity and Conservationen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectAlien plantsen_HK
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen_HK
dc.subjectRoadsideen_HK
dc.subjectStreamen_HK
dc.subjectSyzygium jambosen_HK
dc.subjectTropical Asiaen_HK
dc.titleExotic plant invasion in the highly degraded upland landscape of Hong Kong, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHau, BCH: chhau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHau, BCH=rp00703en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10531-008-9466-5en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58349087395en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros209541en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58349087395&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage191en_HK
dc.identifier.epage202en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262503600012-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GPC=36867564500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHau, BCH=6701358580en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorlett, RT=7005765422en_HK

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