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Article: Holocene environmental changes in the central Inner Mongolia revealed by luminescence dating of the sediments from the Sala Us River valley

TitleHolocene environmental changes in the central Inner Mongolia revealed by luminescence dating of the sediments from the Sala Us River valley
Authors
KeywordsClimate variation
Environmental change
Fluvial deposit
Holocene
Human activity
Issue Date2012
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://hol.sagepub.com
Citation
The Holocene, 2012, v. 22 n. 4, p. 397-404 How to Cite?
AbstractLuminescence dating of the fluvial and lacustrine sediments from the Sala Us River valley at the south edge of the Mu Us Desert, central Inner Mongolia, is reported. The study region lies in the northwestern marginal zone of the east Asian summer monsoon and is sensitive to climate change. The dating results combined with environmental proxies indicate that the Holocene Climate Optimum period, took place from 8.5 to 5 ka ago and was marked by lake development. After 5 ka ago, the region became arid, as inferred from lake regression and fluvial activity. Deposition of fluvial sediments lasted from 5 ka to 2 ka ago. At about 2 ka ago, incision of the Sala Us River was initiated into the underlying sediments, with a down-cutting rate of 3-4 cm/yr. Since 2 ka ago, human activities also played an important role in causing environmental change in the region. © The Author(s) 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163961
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.135
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.147
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, SHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T07:53:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T07:53:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Holocene, 2012, v. 22 n. 4, p. 397-404en_US
dc.identifier.issn0959-6836-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163961-
dc.description.abstractLuminescence dating of the fluvial and lacustrine sediments from the Sala Us River valley at the south edge of the Mu Us Desert, central Inner Mongolia, is reported. The study region lies in the northwestern marginal zone of the east Asian summer monsoon and is sensitive to climate change. The dating results combined with environmental proxies indicate that the Holocene Climate Optimum period, took place from 8.5 to 5 ka ago and was marked by lake development. After 5 ka ago, the region became arid, as inferred from lake regression and fluvial activity. Deposition of fluvial sediments lasted from 5 ka to 2 ka ago. At about 2 ka ago, incision of the Sala Us River was initiated into the underlying sediments, with a down-cutting rate of 3-4 cm/yr. Since 2 ka ago, human activities also played an important role in causing environmental change in the region. © The Author(s) 2011.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://hol.sagepub.com-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Holoceneen_US
dc.rightsThe Holocene. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd.-
dc.subjectClimate variation-
dc.subjectEnvironmental change-
dc.subjectFluvial deposit-
dc.subjectHolocene-
dc.subjectHuman activity-
dc.titleHolocene environmental changes in the central Inner Mongolia revealed by luminescence dating of the sediments from the Sala Us River valleyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, SH: shli@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, B: boli@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, SH=rp00740en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, B=rp00736en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0959683611425543-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863285538-
dc.identifier.hkuros207875en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage397en_US
dc.identifier.epage404en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1477-0911-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000301500500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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