File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Supportive care needs in Hong Kong Chinese women confronting advanced breast cancer

TitleSupportive care needs in Hong Kong Chinese women confronting advanced breast cancer
Authors
KeywordsAdvanced breast cancer
Chinese
Metastatic disease
Supportive care needs
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 n. 5, p. 1144-1151 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Women with advanced breast cancer (ABC) are living longer, so understanding their needs becomes important. This cross-sectional study investigated the type and extent of unmet supportive care needs in Hong Kong Chinese women with advanced breast cancer. Methods: Face-to-face interviews were conducted among women with stage III or stage IV disease mostly awaiting chemotherapy (76%) to identify unmet needs using the Supportive Care Needs Survey Short Form, psychological morbidity using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, symptom distress using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and satisfaction with care using the Patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ-9). Results: About 27-72% of 198/220 (90%) women (mean age=53.4±9.74 (standard deviation)years) identified needs from the health system, information, and patient support (HSIPS) domain as the top 15 most prevalent unmet needs. 'having one member of hospital staff with whom you can talk to about all aspect of your condition, treatment, and follow-up' was most cited by 72% of the patients, with remaining unmet needs addressing mostly desire for information. Unmet need strength did not differ between women with stage III and stage IV disease, whereas women with first time diagnosis reported greater health system and information unmet needs compared with women with recurrent disease. Stepwise multiple regression analyses revealed that symptom distress was consistently positively associated with all but sexuality need domains, whereas low satisfaction with care was associated with HSIPS (β=3.270, p<0.001) and physical and daily living (β=2.810, p<0.01) domains. Discussions: Chinese women with ABC expressed need for continuity of care and improved information provision. High symptom distress was associated with lower levels of satisfaction with care. These unmet needs appear to reflect current care services shortcomings. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163927
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, TKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSoong, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSuen, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSuen, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorSze, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGirgis, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T07:53:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T07:53:17Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 n. 5, p. 1144-1151en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163927-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Women with advanced breast cancer (ABC) are living longer, so understanding their needs becomes important. This cross-sectional study investigated the type and extent of unmet supportive care needs in Hong Kong Chinese women with advanced breast cancer. Methods: Face-to-face interviews were conducted among women with stage III or stage IV disease mostly awaiting chemotherapy (76%) to identify unmet needs using the Supportive Care Needs Survey Short Form, psychological morbidity using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, symptom distress using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and satisfaction with care using the Patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ-9). Results: About 27-72% of 198/220 (90%) women (mean age=53.4±9.74 (standard deviation)years) identified needs from the health system, information, and patient support (HSIPS) domain as the top 15 most prevalent unmet needs. 'having one member of hospital staff with whom you can talk to about all aspect of your condition, treatment, and follow-up' was most cited by 72% of the patients, with remaining unmet needs addressing mostly desire for information. Unmet need strength did not differ between women with stage III and stage IV disease, whereas women with first time diagnosis reported greater health system and information unmet needs compared with women with recurrent disease. Stepwise multiple regression analyses revealed that symptom distress was consistently positively associated with all but sexuality need domains, whereas low satisfaction with care was associated with HSIPS (β=3.270, p<0.001) and physical and daily living (β=2.810, p<0.01) domains. Discussions: Chinese women with ABC expressed need for continuity of care and improved information provision. High symptom distress was associated with lower levels of satisfaction with care. These unmet needs appear to reflect current care services shortcomings. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_HK
dc.subjectAdvanced breast canceren_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectMetastatic diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectSupportive care needsen_HK
dc.titleSupportive care needs in Hong Kong Chinese women confronting advanced breast canceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, W: wwtlam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsang, J: jwhtsang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwong, A: avakwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, W=rp00443en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, J=rp00278en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, A=rp01734en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.3119en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22715115-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84877576299en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros210695en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros216908-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000318629000024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, A=54387984500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, W=7203022022en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, J=35141929400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, TK=55252345300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSoong, I=55252730500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeo, W=7103397662en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSuen, J=55252484000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, WM=7402968894en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KY=55252980000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, A=8913654300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSuen, D=8876971300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSze, WK=55252841000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, A=16309934800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGirgis, A=55088288500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=55091844300en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats