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Article: Judicial Discourse in Cantonese Courtrooms in Postcolonial Hong Kong: The Judge as a Godfather, Scholar, Educator and Scolding Parent

TitleJudicial Discourse in Cantonese Courtrooms in Postcolonial Hong Kong: The Judge as a Godfather, Scholar, Educator and Scolding Parent
Authors
KeywordsCourtroom discourse
Legal language
Legal bilingualism
Judicial behaviour
Postcolonialism
Issue Date2012
PublisherEquinox Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.equinoxjournals.com/IJSLL
Citation
International Journal of Speech Language and the Law, 2012, v. 19 n. 2, p. 239-261 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper presents how legal bilingualism, especially the use of the local language in postcolonial Hong Kong courtrooms, impacts upon judicial behaviour. Through analysing recent cases where local judges seem to be wearing many new hats, I will explore the dynamic relationship between language code and judicial practice, and argue that the use of their first language has unveiled the human side and the often non-legal ideologies of these judges, which were previously masked by a judicial formalism that the use of the ex-coloniser’s language has cultivated. The cases show that the judges perform monolingual style shift and bilingual code switch as a response to their audience and referees. I will attempt to explain their verbal behaviour and describe the slow transformation of legal culture in Hong Kong as a result of its recent move towards legal bilingualism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163655
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.217
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.173
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, JHCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T07:49:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T07:49:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Speech Language and the Law, 2012, v. 19 n. 2, p. 239-261en_US
dc.identifier.issn1748-8885-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163655-
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents how legal bilingualism, especially the use of the local language in postcolonial Hong Kong courtrooms, impacts upon judicial behaviour. Through analysing recent cases where local judges seem to be wearing many new hats, I will explore the dynamic relationship between language code and judicial practice, and argue that the use of their first language has unveiled the human side and the often non-legal ideologies of these judges, which were previously masked by a judicial formalism that the use of the ex-coloniser’s language has cultivated. The cases show that the judges perform monolingual style shift and bilingual code switch as a response to their audience and referees. I will attempt to explain their verbal behaviour and describe the slow transformation of legal culture in Hong Kong as a result of its recent move towards legal bilingualism.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEquinox Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.equinoxjournals.com/IJSLL-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Speech Language and the Lawen_US
dc.subjectCourtroom discourse-
dc.subjectLegal language-
dc.subjectLegal bilingualism-
dc.subjectJudicial behaviour-
dc.subjectPostcolonialism-
dc.titleJudicial Discourse in Cantonese Courtrooms in Postcolonial Hong Kong: The Judge as a Godfather, Scholar, Educator and Scolding Parenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, JHC: hiuchi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, JHC=rp01168en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1558/ijsll.v19i2.239-
dc.identifier.hkuros205897en_US
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage239-
dc.identifier.epage261-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000312963000005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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