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Article: Exploration of attitudes and barriers to bringing patient’s own medications to the Emergency Department: A survey of paramedics

TitleExploration of attitudes and barriers to bringing patient’s own medications to the Emergency Department: A survey of paramedics
Authors
KeywordsAllied health personnel
Ambulances
Emergency medical services
EMS
Emergency medical technician
Hospital emergency department
Paramedic
Survey
Issue Date2008
PublisherMonash University, Centre for Ambulance and Paramedic Studies. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jephc.com/
Citation
Journal of Emergency Primary Health Care, 2008, v. 6 n. 4, p. Article no. 990313 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious research has demonstrated that when ambulance paramedics facilitate patient’s own medications (POM) being brought in to the Emergency Department (ED), the number of prescribing errors on the hospital admission medication chart was significantly decreased, thereby increasing admission prescribing accuracy. Aim We aimed to examine paramedics’ attitudes to bringing POM to the ED and explore the associated barriers. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of ambulance paramedics bringing patients to the ED of a tertiary-referral metropolitan teaching hospital. The questionnaire consisted of 5 questions and took approximately 2 minutes to complete. Results The response rate for the survey was 81.9% (50/61). The study demonstrated a general agreement that bringing POM to the ED was important. Most highly rated barriers noted by respondents to bringing POM included time limitations (60%), location of patient pick up (44%), fear of losing patient’s medications (24%) and patient’s refusal (18%). Conclusions Overall, paramedics perceived bringing POM to ED as being important. There are identifiable barriers to paramedics bringing POM to the Emergency Department on admission. Resolution of such barriers may increase the frequency with which POM is brought to hospital, leading to a positive impact on prescribing accuracy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163630
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, EWY-
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, S-
dc.contributor.authorMarriott, J-
dc.contributor.authorBarger, B-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-14T03:51:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-14T03:51:48Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Emergency Primary Health Care, 2008, v. 6 n. 4, p. Article no. 990313-
dc.identifier.issn1447-4999-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163630-
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has demonstrated that when ambulance paramedics facilitate patient’s own medications (POM) being brought in to the Emergency Department (ED), the number of prescribing errors on the hospital admission medication chart was significantly decreased, thereby increasing admission prescribing accuracy. Aim We aimed to examine paramedics’ attitudes to bringing POM to the ED and explore the associated barriers. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of ambulance paramedics bringing patients to the ED of a tertiary-referral metropolitan teaching hospital. The questionnaire consisted of 5 questions and took approximately 2 minutes to complete. Results The response rate for the survey was 81.9% (50/61). The study demonstrated a general agreement that bringing POM to the ED was important. Most highly rated barriers noted by respondents to bringing POM included time limitations (60%), location of patient pick up (44%), fear of losing patient’s medications (24%) and patient’s refusal (18%). Conclusions Overall, paramedics perceived bringing POM to ED as being important. There are identifiable barriers to paramedics bringing POM to the Emergency Department on admission. Resolution of such barriers may increase the frequency with which POM is brought to hospital, leading to a positive impact on prescribing accuracy.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMonash University, Centre for Ambulance and Paramedic Studies. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jephc.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Emergency Primary Health Care-
dc.subjectAllied health personnel-
dc.subjectAmbulances-
dc.subjectEmergency medical services-
dc.subjectEMS-
dc.subjectEmergency medical technician-
dc.subjectHospital emergency department-
dc.subjectParamedic-
dc.subjectSurvey-
dc.titleExploration of attitudes and barriers to bringing patient’s own medications to the Emergency Department: A survey of paramedicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, EWY: ewchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.volume6-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spageArticle no. 990313-
dc.identifier.epageArticle no. 990313-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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