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Article: Endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor

TitleEndothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor
Authors
Issue Date1990
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/JVR
Citation
Blood Vessels, 1990, v. 27 n. 2-5, p. 238-245 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough nitric oxide appears to be the major endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), it cannot explain all endothelium-dependent responses of isolated arteries. Thus, acetylcholine causes an endothelium-dependent, transient hyperpolarization, which is due to the release from the endothelial cells of a diffusible substance (endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, EDHF) other than nitric oxide. The muscarinic receptors on the endothelium that trigger the release of EDHF belong to the M1-muscarinic subtype, while those activating the liberation of EDRF are M2-muscarinic in nature. The importance of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization varies among different blood vessels. The hyperpolarization, and the resulting relaxation caused by EDHF can be attributed to an increase in K+ conductance in the vascular smooth muscle. Although the nature of EDHF remains elusive, it may be a labile metabolic of arachidonic acid.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163622
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKomori, K-
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMGR-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T03:27:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-12T03:27:37Z-
dc.date.issued1990-
dc.identifier.citationBlood Vessels, 1990, v. 27 n. 2-5, p. 238-245-
dc.identifier.issn0303-6847-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163622-
dc.description.abstractAlthough nitric oxide appears to be the major endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), it cannot explain all endothelium-dependent responses of isolated arteries. Thus, acetylcholine causes an endothelium-dependent, transient hyperpolarization, which is due to the release from the endothelial cells of a diffusible substance (endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, EDHF) other than nitric oxide. The muscarinic receptors on the endothelium that trigger the release of EDHF belong to the M1-muscarinic subtype, while those activating the liberation of EDRF are M2-muscarinic in nature. The importance of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization varies among different blood vessels. The hyperpolarization, and the resulting relaxation caused by EDHF can be attributed to an increase in K+ conductance in the vascular smooth muscle. Although the nature of EDHF remains elusive, it may be a labile metabolic of arachidonic acid.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/JVR-
dc.relation.ispartofBlood Vessels-
dc.rightsBlood Vessels. Copyright © S Karger AG.-
dc.subject.meshAcetylcholine - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshArteries - drug effects - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshMuscle Tonus-
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Smooth, Vascular - drug effects - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide - metabolism - pharmacology-
dc.titleEndothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factoren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PMGR: vanhoutt@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid2242444-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025104097-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue2-5-
dc.identifier.spage238-
dc.identifier.epage245-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990EJ15600019-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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