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Article: New NICE Guideline on the treatment of Hypertension

TitleNew NICE Guideline on the treatment of Hypertension
Authors
KeywordsGuideline
Hypertension
NICE
Issue Date2012
PublisherHong Kong College of Cardiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcchk.com/journals.php#3
Citation
Journal of the Hong Kong College of Cardiology, 2012, v. 20 n. 1, p. 15-20 How to Cite?
AbstractThe British guidelines on the management of primary hypertension, developed by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE), have just been published in August 2011. There are several significant changes in the diagnosis and the treatment for primary hypertension in adults. Ambulatory blood pressure measurement should be regarded as the new gold standard in the diagnosis. Home blood pressure monitoring is also useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of hypertension. Because of the results of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial study, calcium channel blockers (CCB) and blockers of the renin-angiotensin system have surpassed diuretics and beta-blockers as first line options. Patients younger than 55 should receive an ACE inhibitor, or an angiotensin receptor blocker if the former is not tolerated. Older patients should be started on a CCB. A thiazide diuretic can be used as an adjunct to the first line treatment. Chorthalidone and indapamide are preferred as they showed favorable outcomes in large clinical trials. Treatment with these three drug classes should be sufficient in the majority of patients, but if triple therapy is still insufficient, referral to a hypertension specialist is recommended. Further diuretic therapy with spironolactone can be used as the fourth line treatment. Some aspects of the new guideline are controversial, such as the practical difficulties of using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in family practice, and the arbitrary blood pressure cutoff levels. Many doctors also believe that control of blood pressure is best achieved using a wider range of drugs to suit the individual patient.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163498
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.102
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:32:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:32:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the Hong Kong College of Cardiology, 2012, v. 20 n. 1, p. 15-20en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1027-7811en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163498-
dc.description.abstractThe British guidelines on the management of primary hypertension, developed by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE), have just been published in August 2011. There are several significant changes in the diagnosis and the treatment for primary hypertension in adults. Ambulatory blood pressure measurement should be regarded as the new gold standard in the diagnosis. Home blood pressure monitoring is also useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of hypertension. Because of the results of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial study, calcium channel blockers (CCB) and blockers of the renin-angiotensin system have surpassed diuretics and beta-blockers as first line options. Patients younger than 55 should receive an ACE inhibitor, or an angiotensin receptor blocker if the former is not tolerated. Older patients should be started on a CCB. A thiazide diuretic can be used as an adjunct to the first line treatment. Chorthalidone and indapamide are preferred as they showed favorable outcomes in large clinical trials. Treatment with these three drug classes should be sufficient in the majority of patients, but if triple therapy is still insufficient, referral to a hypertension specialist is recommended. Further diuretic therapy with spironolactone can be used as the fourth line treatment. Some aspects of the new guideline are controversial, such as the practical difficulties of using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in family practice, and the arbitrary blood pressure cutoff levels. Many doctors also believe that control of blood pressure is best achieved using a wider range of drugs to suit the individual patient.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong College of Cardiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcchk.com/journals.php#3en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Hong Kong College of Cardiologyen_HK
dc.subjectGuidelineen_HK
dc.subjectHypertensionen_HK
dc.subjectNICEen_HK
dc.titleNew NICE Guideline on the treatment of Hypertensionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, TT: tcheungt@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, TT=rp01682en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862310366en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros208510-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862310366&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage15en_HK
dc.identifier.epage20en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, TT=55060906800en_HK

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