File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Bisphosphonates and glucocorticoid osteoporosis in men: results of a randomized controlled trial comparing zoledronic acid with risedronate

TitleBisphosphonates and glucocorticoid osteoporosis in men: results of a randomized controlled trial comparing zoledronic acid with risedronate
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/bone
Citation
Bone, 2012, v. 50 n. 1, p. 289-295 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: We studied 265 men (mean age 56.4 years; range 18-83 years), among patients enrolled in two arms of a double-blind, 1-year study comparing the effects of zoledronic acid (ZOL) with risedronate (RIS) in patients either commencing (prednisolone 7.5 mg/day or equivalent) (prevention arm, n=88) or continuing glucocorticoid therapy (treatment arm, n=177). METHODS: Patients received either a single ZOL 5 mg infusion or RIS 5 mg oral daily at randomization, along with calcium (1000 mg) and vitamin D (400-1200 IU). Primary endpoint: difference in percentage change from baseline in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (LS) at 12 months. Secondary endpoints: percentage changes in BMD at total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN), relative changes in bone turnover markers (beta-CTx and P1NP), and overall safety. FINDINGS: In the treatment subpopulation, ZOL increased LS BMD by 4.7% vs. 3.3% for RIS and at TH the percentage changes were 1.8% vs. 0.2%, respectively. In the prevention subpopulation, bone loss was prevented by both treatments. At LS the percentage changes were 2.5% vs. -0.2% for ZOL vs. RIS and at TH the percentage changes were 1.1% vs. -0.4%, respectively. ZOL significantly increased lumbar spine BMD more than RIS at Month 12 in both the prevention population (p=0.0024) and the treatment subpopulation (p=0.0232) in men. In the treatment subpopulation, ZOL demonstrated a significantly greater reduction in serum beta-CTx and P1NP relative to RIS at all time-points. In the prevention subpopulation, ZOL significantly reduced beta-CTx at all time-points, and P1NP at Month 3 (p=0.0297) only. Both treatments were well tolerated in men, albeit with a higher incidence of influenza-like illness and pyrexia events post-infusion with ZOL. INTERPRETATION: Once-yearly ZOL preserves or increases BMD within 1 year to a greater extent than daily RIS in men receiving glucocorticoid therapy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163422
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.736
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.752
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSambrook, PNen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoux, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorDevogelaer, JPen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaag, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorReginster, JYen_US
dc.contributor.authorBucci-Rechtweg, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorSu, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorReid, DMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:31:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:31:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationBone, 2012, v. 50 n. 1, p. 289-295en_US
dc.identifier.issn8756-3282en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163422-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We studied 265 men (mean age 56.4 years; range 18-83 years), among patients enrolled in two arms of a double-blind, 1-year study comparing the effects of zoledronic acid (ZOL) with risedronate (RIS) in patients either commencing (prednisolone 7.5 mg/day or equivalent) (prevention arm, n=88) or continuing glucocorticoid therapy (treatment arm, n=177). METHODS: Patients received either a single ZOL 5 mg infusion or RIS 5 mg oral daily at randomization, along with calcium (1000 mg) and vitamin D (400-1200 IU). Primary endpoint: difference in percentage change from baseline in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (LS) at 12 months. Secondary endpoints: percentage changes in BMD at total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN), relative changes in bone turnover markers (beta-CTx and P1NP), and overall safety. FINDINGS: In the treatment subpopulation, ZOL increased LS BMD by 4.7% vs. 3.3% for RIS and at TH the percentage changes were 1.8% vs. 0.2%, respectively. In the prevention subpopulation, bone loss was prevented by both treatments. At LS the percentage changes were 2.5% vs. -0.2% for ZOL vs. RIS and at TH the percentage changes were 1.1% vs. -0.4%, respectively. ZOL significantly increased lumbar spine BMD more than RIS at Month 12 in both the prevention population (p=0.0024) and the treatment subpopulation (p=0.0232) in men. In the treatment subpopulation, ZOL demonstrated a significantly greater reduction in serum beta-CTx and P1NP relative to RIS at all time-points. In the prevention subpopulation, ZOL significantly reduced beta-CTx at all time-points, and P1NP at Month 3 (p=0.0297) only. Both treatments were well tolerated in men, albeit with a higher incidence of influenza-like illness and pyrexia events post-infusion with ZOL. INTERPRETATION: Once-yearly ZOL preserves or increases BMD within 1 year to a greater extent than daily RIS in men receiving glucocorticoid therapy.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/boneen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBoneen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Density Conservation Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic useen_US
dc.subject.meshDiphosphonates - pharmacology - therapeutic useen_US
dc.subject.meshEtidronic Acid - analogs and derivatives - pharmacology - therapeutic useen_US
dc.subject.meshGlucocorticoids - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic useen_US
dc.subject.meshImidazoles - pharmacology - therapeutic useen_US
dc.titleBisphosphonates and glucocorticoid osteoporosis in men: results of a randomized controlled trial comparing zoledronic acid with risedronateen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSambrook, PN: sambrook@med.usyd.edu.auen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, CS: cslau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CS=rp01348en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bone.2011.10.024en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22061864-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-82055202810en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros206736-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-82055202810&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume50en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage289en_US
dc.identifier.epage295en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299064200036-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReid, DM=35372429900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSu, G=7201359489en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBucciRechtweg, C=35274367400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReginster, JY=35378176800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CS=14035682100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaag, K=35448182000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDevogelaer, JP=35271465400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRoux, C=14054986200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSambrook, PN=7103142193en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9976585-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats