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Article: Distribution of culprit lesions in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention

TitleDistribution of culprit lesions in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention
Authors
KeywordsAcute Coronary Syndrome
Plaque Rupture
Risk Factors
Issue Date2011
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.coronary-artery.com
Citation
Coronary Artery Disease, 2011, v. 22 n. 8, p. 533-536 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Data regarding the distribution of vulnerable lesions in the coronary arteries are scarce. The aim was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of culprit lesions in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. In addition, the location of culprit lesions was related to infarct size. Methods: Consecutive patients (N=1533, mean age 61±12 years) were evaluated. All patients were treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention and underwent two-dimensional echocardiography less than 48 h after admission. Results: The majority of the culprit lesions were located in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD, 45%), followed by the right coronary artery (RCA, 38%), and left circumflex coronary artery (LCX, 14%). Subanalysis demonstrated that patients with a culprit lesion in the LAD and LCX had significantly higher-peak cardiac enzymes compared with patients with culprit lesions in the RCA. In addition, patients with proximal LAD and LCX lesions had significantly worse left ventricular function compared with patients with mid or distal lesions. Conclusion: Plaque rupture resulting in acute myocardial infarction is more likely to occur in the proximal parts of the LAD and RCA. In addition, the location of culprit lesions was related to infarct size. Therefore, knowledge of the distribution of vulnerable lesions is important for identifying patients at risk for acute coronary events. © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163420
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.553
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.712
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAntoni, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorAtary, JZen_US
dc.contributor.authorDelgado, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorHolman, ERen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Wall, EEen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchuijf, JDen_US
dc.contributor.authorBax, JJen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchalij, MJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:31:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:31:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationCoronary Artery Disease, 2011, v. 22 n. 8, p. 533-536en_US
dc.identifier.issn0954-6928en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163420-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Data regarding the distribution of vulnerable lesions in the coronary arteries are scarce. The aim was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of culprit lesions in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. In addition, the location of culprit lesions was related to infarct size. Methods: Consecutive patients (N=1533, mean age 61±12 years) were evaluated. All patients were treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention and underwent two-dimensional echocardiography less than 48 h after admission. Results: The majority of the culprit lesions were located in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD, 45%), followed by the right coronary artery (RCA, 38%), and left circumflex coronary artery (LCX, 14%). Subanalysis demonstrated that patients with a culprit lesion in the LAD and LCX had significantly higher-peak cardiac enzymes compared with patients with culprit lesions in the RCA. In addition, patients with proximal LAD and LCX lesions had significantly worse left ventricular function compared with patients with mid or distal lesions. Conclusion: Plaque rupture resulting in acute myocardial infarction is more likely to occur in the proximal parts of the LAD and RCA. In addition, the location of culprit lesions was related to infarct size. Therefore, knowledge of the distribution of vulnerable lesions is important for identifying patients at risk for acute coronary events. © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.coronary-artery.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCoronary Artery Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectAcute Coronary Syndromeen_US
dc.subjectPlaque Ruptureen_US
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen_US
dc.titleDistribution of culprit lesions in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary interventionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, KH:khkyiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, KH=rp01490en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MCA.0b013e32834c7552en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21946526-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81855185331en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros205995-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-81855185331&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage533en_US
dc.identifier.epage536en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296844400003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAntoni, ML=12768731500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, KH=35172267800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAtary, JZ=35794862300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDelgado, V=24172709900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHolman, ER=7006388037en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Der Wall, EE=7101764510en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchuijf, JD=6602555819en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBax, JJ=35379683700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchalij, MJ=7007083597en_US

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