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Article: Relationships between vascular dysfunction, circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and psychological status in healthy subjects

TitleRelationships between vascular dysfunction, circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and psychological status in healthy subjects
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.wiley.com/1091-4269/
Citation
Depression And Anxiety, 2011, v. 28 n. 8, p. 719-727 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Although the mechanisms remain unclear, depression and mental stress are associated with endothelial dysfunction and increases risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent studies suggest that circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) play an important role in endothelial repair and correlate with endothelial function. Methods: We studied the relationship between the level of circulating CD34/KDR + EPCs and CD133/KDR + EPCs, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), Depression Anxiety Stress Scales in 129 normal individuals (54 ± 10 years, 54 men) without prior CVD or diabetes. Results: Their median depression score (DS) and stress score (SS) was 4 (range 0-34) and 6 (range 0-32), respectively. As defined by the ≥75th percentile, 41 subjects (32%) had high DS (≥8) and 31 (24%) had high SS (≥14). Subjects with high DS had significantly lower FMD (5.4 ± 2.7 versus 8.0 ± 4.0%, P<0.001) and percentage of CD34/KDR + EPC (1.2 ± 1.3 versus 2.0 ± 2.4%, P = 0.037), but not CD133/KDR + EPC (0.56 ± 0.42 versus 0.68 ± 0.76%, P = 0.44), than those with normal DS. In contrast, there were no significant difference in FMD (6.8 ± 3.5 versus 7.3 ± 3.9%, P = 0.46), percentages of circulating CD34/KDR + EPC (1.20 ± 1.28 versus 1.95 ± 2.34%, P = 0.052) and CD133/KDR + EPC (0.55 ± 0.41 versus 0.67 ± 0.73%, P = 0.52) between subjects with high and normal SS. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that high DS (OR 1.08, 95% CI: 1.02-1.15, P = 0.010) and old age (OR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.10, P = 0.019), but not SS or percentage of circulating EPC, were independent predictors for decreased FMD. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that, in subjects without significant CVD, a high DS was associated with impaired brachial FMD and depletion of circulating EPC. However, only DS, but not SS or EPC count, was an independent predictor for impaired brachial FMD. Depression and Anxiety, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163389
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.004
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.491
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, HFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:30:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:30:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationDepression And Anxiety, 2011, v. 28 n. 8, p. 719-727en_US
dc.identifier.issn1091-4269en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163389-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although the mechanisms remain unclear, depression and mental stress are associated with endothelial dysfunction and increases risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent studies suggest that circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) play an important role in endothelial repair and correlate with endothelial function. Methods: We studied the relationship between the level of circulating CD34/KDR + EPCs and CD133/KDR + EPCs, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), Depression Anxiety Stress Scales in 129 normal individuals (54 ± 10 years, 54 men) without prior CVD or diabetes. Results: Their median depression score (DS) and stress score (SS) was 4 (range 0-34) and 6 (range 0-32), respectively. As defined by the ≥75th percentile, 41 subjects (32%) had high DS (≥8) and 31 (24%) had high SS (≥14). Subjects with high DS had significantly lower FMD (5.4 ± 2.7 versus 8.0 ± 4.0%, P<0.001) and percentage of CD34/KDR + EPC (1.2 ± 1.3 versus 2.0 ± 2.4%, P = 0.037), but not CD133/KDR + EPC (0.56 ± 0.42 versus 0.68 ± 0.76%, P = 0.44), than those with normal DS. In contrast, there were no significant difference in FMD (6.8 ± 3.5 versus 7.3 ± 3.9%, P = 0.46), percentages of circulating CD34/KDR + EPC (1.20 ± 1.28 versus 1.95 ± 2.34%, P = 0.052) and CD133/KDR + EPC (0.55 ± 0.41 versus 0.67 ± 0.73%, P = 0.52) between subjects with high and normal SS. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that high DS (OR 1.08, 95% CI: 1.02-1.15, P = 0.010) and old age (OR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.10, P = 0.019), but not SS or percentage of circulating EPC, were independent predictors for decreased FMD. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that, in subjects without significant CVD, a high DS was associated with impaired brachial FMD and depletion of circulating EPC. However, only DS, but not SS or EPC count, was an independent predictor for impaired brachial FMD. Depression and Anxiety, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.wiley.com/1091-4269/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofDepression and Anxietyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshBrachial Artery - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - Pathology - Physiopathology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression - Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshEndothelial Cells - Pathology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascular - Cytology - Pathology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFlow Cytometryen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPsychological Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshStem Cells - Pathology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - Diagnosis - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleRelationships between vascular dysfunction, circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and psychological status in healthy subjectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, KH:khkyiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, HF:hftse@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, KH=rp01490en_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, HF=rp00428en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/da.20839en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21681866-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960940157en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros225175-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960940157&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage719en_US
dc.identifier.epage727en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293808000012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=20733607100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, KH=35172267800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, HF=7006070805en_US

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