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Article: Avoiding medication errors-what is the best evidenced based practice

TitleAvoiding medication errors-what is the best evidenced based practice
Authors
KeywordsComputerized Physician Order Entry
Dispensing Errors
Drug Administration Errors
Medication Errors
Prescribing Errors
Issue Date2011
Citation
International Journal Of Pharmacy And Technology, 2011, v. 3 n. 1, p. 1722-1739 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Medication errors are costly and a threat to patient safety. This article aims to review practices, with a special emphasis on technological interventions employed to reduce medication errors and to discuss the value of these different applications. Materials and methods: A literature review was conducted using PubMed to find articles whose title and abstract indicated that the articles' content addressed technological interventions to minimize medication errors. Bibliographies of resulting articles were also reviewed and selected for discussion. Results and discussion: After a qualitative analysis by two reviewers, 70 articles were selected for review and discussion. Computerized physician order entry, is widely used and is useful in minimizing many errors in the 'Medication Use Process'. Clinical decision support systems, personal digital assistants and mobile clinical assistants have shown to be very effective in minimizing prescribing errors. Using machines instead of man as in automated dispensing machines, bar coding, robotic dispensing and 'Smart' devices have been tried experimentally to contain drug dispensing and drug administration errors. Conclusions: There is evidence that technological interventions have contributed to minimize medication errors, but their usability, cost benefits and safety need to be further evaluated.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163371
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.135
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, NRen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:30:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:30:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Pharmacy And Technology, 2011, v. 3 n. 1, p. 1722-1739en_US
dc.identifier.issn0975-766Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163371-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Medication errors are costly and a threat to patient safety. This article aims to review practices, with a special emphasis on technological interventions employed to reduce medication errors and to discuss the value of these different applications. Materials and methods: A literature review was conducted using PubMed to find articles whose title and abstract indicated that the articles' content addressed technological interventions to minimize medication errors. Bibliographies of resulting articles were also reviewed and selected for discussion. Results and discussion: After a qualitative analysis by two reviewers, 70 articles were selected for review and discussion. Computerized physician order entry, is widely used and is useful in minimizing many errors in the 'Medication Use Process'. Clinical decision support systems, personal digital assistants and mobile clinical assistants have shown to be very effective in minimizing prescribing errors. Using machines instead of man as in automated dispensing machines, bar coding, robotic dispensing and 'Smart' devices have been tried experimentally to contain drug dispensing and drug administration errors. Conclusions: There is evidence that technological interventions have contributed to minimize medication errors, but their usability, cost benefits and safety need to be further evaluated.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Pharmacy and Technologyen_US
dc.subjectComputerized Physician Order Entryen_US
dc.subjectDispensing Errorsen_US
dc.subjectDrug Administration Errorsen_US
dc.subjectMedication Errorsen_US
dc.subjectPrescribing Errorsen_US
dc.titleAvoiding medication errors-what is the best evidenced based practiceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY:mycheung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953850376en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79953850376&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage1722en_US
dc.identifier.epage1739en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, NR=37081701500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_US

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