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Article: Absence of NPM1 promoter hypermethylation in human myelodysplastic syndrome
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TitleAbsence of NPM1 promoter hypermethylation in human myelodysplastic syndrome
 
AuthorsCheng, YY1 2
Chau, D1
Chan, T1
Gill, H1
Liang, R1
Kwong, YL1
Tse, E1
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcp.bmjjournals.com/
 
CitationJournal Of Clinical Pathology, 2010, v. 63 n. 11, p. 1008-1011 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2010.080465
 
AbstractNpm1 +/- heterozygous mice develop a haematological disorder with features resembling human myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Promoter hypermethylation of the NPM1 gene may lead to suppressed gene transcription and hence functional haploinsufficiency, which contributes to the development of MDS. Thirty-one patients with MDS and eight normal individuals were studied for promoter methylation and mRNA expression of NPM1. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP), COBRA and bisulfite sequencing were used to examine the NPM1 methylation status. Quantitative PCR was used to assess the expression of NPM1. NPM1 DNA methylation was rare, occurring in one of 31 cases as determined by MSP. There was no significant difference in NPM1 mRNA expression between MDS and normal blood samples. In conclusion, the finding suggests that NPM1 methylation is rare in MDS and does not play a major role in its pathogenesis.
 
ISSN0021-9746
2013 Impact Factor: 2.551
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2010.080465
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000283349800011
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheng, YY
 
dc.contributor.authorChau, D
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, T
 
dc.contributor.authorGill, H
 
dc.contributor.authorLiang, R
 
dc.contributor.authorKwong, YL
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, E
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:30:19Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:30:19Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractNpm1 +/- heterozygous mice develop a haematological disorder with features resembling human myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Promoter hypermethylation of the NPM1 gene may lead to suppressed gene transcription and hence functional haploinsufficiency, which contributes to the development of MDS. Thirty-one patients with MDS and eight normal individuals were studied for promoter methylation and mRNA expression of NPM1. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP), COBRA and bisulfite sequencing were used to examine the NPM1 methylation status. Quantitative PCR was used to assess the expression of NPM1. NPM1 DNA methylation was rare, occurring in one of 31 cases as determined by MSP. There was no significant difference in NPM1 mRNA expression between MDS and normal blood samples. In conclusion, the finding suggests that NPM1 methylation is rare in MDS and does not play a major role in its pathogenesis.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Pathology, 2010, v. 63 n. 11, p. 1008-1011 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2010.080465
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2010.080465
 
dc.identifier.eissn1472-4146
 
dc.identifier.epage1011
 
dc.identifier.hkuros207911
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283349800011
 
dc.identifier.issn0021-9746
2013 Impact Factor: 2.551
 
dc.identifier.issue11
 
dc.identifier.pmid20924036
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78149359076
 
dc.identifier.spage1008
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163343
 
dc.identifier.volume63
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcp.bmjjournals.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Pathology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Over
 
dc.subject.meshDna Methylation
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGene Expression
 
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition To Disease
 
dc.subject.meshHaploinsufficiency
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshMyelodysplastic Syndromes - Genetics - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshNuclear Proteins - Biosynthesis - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshPromoter Regions, Genetic - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshRna, Messenger - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - Methods
 
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
 
dc.titleAbsence of NPM1 promoter hypermethylation in human myelodysplastic syndrome
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Gill, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Liang, R</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kwong, YL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tse, E</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Sydney