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Article: Role of notch signaling in colorectal cancer

TitleRole of notch signaling in colorectal cancer
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://carcin.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Carcinogenesis, 2009, v. 30 n. 12, p. 1979-1986 How to Cite?
AbstractNotch signaling is an important molecular pathway involved in the determination of cell fate. In recent years, this signaling has been frequently reported to play a critical role in maintaining progenitor/stem cell population as well as a balance between cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Thus, Notch signaling may be mechanistically involved carcinogenesis. Indeed, many studies have showed that Notch signaling is overexpressed or constitutively activated in many cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). Consequently, inactivation of Notch signaling may constitute a novel molecular therapy for cancer. CRC is one of the most common malignancies but the current therapeutic approaches for advanced CRC are less efficient. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches are badly needed. In this review article, the authors reviewed the current understanding and research findings of the role of Notch signaling in CRC and discussed the possible Notch-targeting approaches in CRC. © The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163289
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.874
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.439
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQiao, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:29:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:29:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCarcinogenesis, 2009, v. 30 n. 12, p. 1979-1986en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-3334en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163289-
dc.description.abstractNotch signaling is an important molecular pathway involved in the determination of cell fate. In recent years, this signaling has been frequently reported to play a critical role in maintaining progenitor/stem cell population as well as a balance between cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Thus, Notch signaling may be mechanistically involved carcinogenesis. Indeed, many studies have showed that Notch signaling is overexpressed or constitutively activated in many cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). Consequently, inactivation of Notch signaling may constitute a novel molecular therapy for cancer. CRC is one of the most common malignancies but the current therapeutic approaches for advanced CRC are less efficient. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches are badly needed. In this review article, the authors reviewed the current understanding and research findings of the role of Notch signaling in CRC and discussed the possible Notch-targeting approaches in CRC. © The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://carcin.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCarcinogenesisen_HK
dc.titleRole of notch signaling in colorectal canceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailQiao, L: lq8688@hotmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, BC: bcywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityQiao, L=rp00513en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, BC=rp00429en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/carcin/bgp236en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19793799-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73949094187en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-73949094187&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1979en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1986en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272684700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiao, L=7202151719en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, BC=7402023340en_HK

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