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Article: Serum fibroblast growth factor 21 is associated with adverse lipid profiles and γ-glutamyltransferase but not insulin sensitivity in Chinese subjects

TitleSerum fibroblast growth factor 21 is associated with adverse lipid profiles and γ-glutamyltransferase but not insulin sensitivity in Chinese subjects
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 2009, v. 94 n. 6, p. 2151-2156 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21, a hormone primarily secreted by liver, has recently been shown to have beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in animal models. This study investigated the association of serum FGF21 levels with insulin secretion and sensitivity, as well as circulating parameters of lipid metabolism and hepatic enzymes in Chinese subjects. Design: Serum FGF21 levels were determined by ELISA in 134 normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 101 isolated-impaired fasting glucose, and 118 isolated-impaired glucose tolerance (I-IGT) Chinese subjects, and their association with parameters of adiposity, glucose, and lipid profiles, and levels of liver injury markers was studied. In a subgroup of this study, the hyperglycemic clamp technique was performed in 31 NGT, 17 isolated-impaired fasting glucose, and 15 I-IGT subjects to measure insulin secretion and sensitivity to test the associations with serum FGF21. Results: The serum FGF21 levels in I-IGT were significantly higher than NGT subjects [164.6 pg/ml (89.7, 261.0) vs. 111.8 pg/ml (58.0, 198.9); P < 0.05], and correlated positively with several parameters of adiposity. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed an independent association of serum FGF21 with serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and γ-glutamyltransferase (all P < 0.05). However, FGF21 did not correlate with insulin secretion and sensitivity, as measured by hyperglycemic clamp and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Conclusions: Serum levels of FGF21 are closely related to adiposity, lipid metabolism, and biomarkers of liver injury but not insulin secretion and sensitivity in humans. Copyright © 2009 by The Endocrine Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163251
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.531
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.940
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorBao, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorPan, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorXiang, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorJia, Wen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:29:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:29:10Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 2009, v. 94 n. 6, p. 2151-2156en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-972Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163251-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21, a hormone primarily secreted by liver, has recently been shown to have beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in animal models. This study investigated the association of serum FGF21 levels with insulin secretion and sensitivity, as well as circulating parameters of lipid metabolism and hepatic enzymes in Chinese subjects. Design: Serum FGF21 levels were determined by ELISA in 134 normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 101 isolated-impaired fasting glucose, and 118 isolated-impaired glucose tolerance (I-IGT) Chinese subjects, and their association with parameters of adiposity, glucose, and lipid profiles, and levels of liver injury markers was studied. In a subgroup of this study, the hyperglycemic clamp technique was performed in 31 NGT, 17 isolated-impaired fasting glucose, and 15 I-IGT subjects to measure insulin secretion and sensitivity to test the associations with serum FGF21. Results: The serum FGF21 levels in I-IGT were significantly higher than NGT subjects [164.6 pg/ml (89.7, 261.0) vs. 111.8 pg/ml (58.0, 198.9); P < 0.05], and correlated positively with several parameters of adiposity. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed an independent association of serum FGF21 with serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and γ-glutamyltransferase (all P < 0.05). However, FGF21 did not correlate with insulin secretion and sensitivity, as measured by hyperglycemic clamp and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Conclusions: Serum levels of FGF21 are closely related to adiposity, lipid metabolism, and biomarkers of liver injury but not insulin secretion and sensitivity in humans. Copyright © 2009 by The Endocrine Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAdiposity - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFibroblast Growth Factors - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshGlucose Clamp Techniqueen_US
dc.subject.meshGlucose Intolerance - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshGlucose Tolerance Testen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistance - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLipid Metabolism - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLipids - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshLiver Diseases - Blood - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshGamma-Glutamyltransferase - Blooden_US
dc.titleSerum fibroblast growth factor 21 is associated with adverse lipid profiles and γ-glutamyltransferase but not insulin sensitivity in Chinese subjectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailXu, A:amxu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityXu, A=rp00485en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jc.2008-2331en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19318452en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-66749106885en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros157967-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-66749106885&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume94en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage2151en_US
dc.identifier.epage2156en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266587800047-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, H=24066677600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBao, Y=36062711100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, A=7202655409en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPan, X=35176494300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, J=26643171900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, H=14042912600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, H=9249862400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiang, K=7005183250en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJia, W=34768292900en_US

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