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Article: Onset and disappearance of reflux symptoms in a Chinese population: A 1-year follow-up study

TitleOnset and disappearance of reflux symptoms in a Chinese population: A 1-year follow-up study
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APT
Citation
Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2004, v. 20 n. 7, p. 803-812 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The natural history of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Asian population has not been studied before. Aim: To study the onset and disappearances of reflux symptoms over a 1-year period in the Chinese population. Methods: A population-based telephone survey was performed in 2002 and repeated 1 year later. The change in prevalence rate, onset and disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and the change in diagnoses were assessed. Factors associated with the onset and disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were studied. Results: A total of 712 subjects completed the first and second survey. The annual, monthly and weekly prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were 34.1%, 10.1% and 2.7% respectively. The onset rate (per 1000 person-year) and disappearance rate of any gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and frequent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (≥ monthly symptoms) were 209, 40; and 395, 243 respectively. Forty-four percentage of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease subjects changed their diagnoses in 2003. By multiple logistic regression analysis, high anxiety score (OR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1-1.2) and higher educational level (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-6.3) were associated with the onset of gastrooesophageal reflux disease; while the frequency of acid regurgitation (OR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.17-0.70) and use of antisecretory therapy (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.28-0.89) were associated with the disappearance of gastrooesophageal reflux disease. Conclusion: The prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is stable over 1 year. Higher anxiety score and higher educational level were associated with the onset of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, while lower frequency of reflux symptoms and infrequent use of antisecretory therapy were associated with the disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in a Chinese population.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163189
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 5.727
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.609
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, JQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXia, HHXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, WHCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:28:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:28:34Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2004, v. 20 n. 7, p. 803-812en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0269-2813en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163189-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The natural history of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Asian population has not been studied before. Aim: To study the onset and disappearances of reflux symptoms over a 1-year period in the Chinese population. Methods: A population-based telephone survey was performed in 2002 and repeated 1 year later. The change in prevalence rate, onset and disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and the change in diagnoses were assessed. Factors associated with the onset and disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were studied. Results: A total of 712 subjects completed the first and second survey. The annual, monthly and weekly prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease were 34.1%, 10.1% and 2.7% respectively. The onset rate (per 1000 person-year) and disappearance rate of any gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and frequent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (≥ monthly symptoms) were 209, 40; and 395, 243 respectively. Forty-four percentage of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease subjects changed their diagnoses in 2003. By multiple logistic regression analysis, high anxiety score (OR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1-1.2) and higher educational level (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-6.3) were associated with the onset of gastrooesophageal reflux disease; while the frequency of acid regurgitation (OR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.17-0.70) and use of antisecretory therapy (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.28-0.89) were associated with the disappearance of gastrooesophageal reflux disease. Conclusion: The prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is stable over 1 year. Higher anxiety score and higher educational level were associated with the onset of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, while lower frequency of reflux symptoms and infrequent use of antisecretory therapy were associated with the disappearance of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in a Chinese population.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/APTen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeuticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshGastroesophageal Reflux - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Services - Utilizationen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance Of Health Care - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.titleOnset and disappearance of reflux symptoms in a Chinese population: A 1-year follow-up studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KF: hrntlkf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, BCY: bcywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KF=rp00718en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, BCY=rp00429en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2036.2004.02198.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15379841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4844224394en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros103623-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4844224394&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage803en_HK
dc.identifier.epage812en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000223995900011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WM=7403972413en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, KC=7402135595en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KF=8948421200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, WM=7103196477en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, JQ=7403635051en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXia, HHX=8757161400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, WHC=25932937100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CLK=24755913900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CK=7404813960en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SK=7402279473en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, BCY=7402023340en_HK
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130730-

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