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Article: The smiley as a simple screening tool for depression after stroke: A preliminary study

TitleThe smiley as a simple screening tool for depression after stroke: A preliminary study
Authors
KeywordsDepression
Depression after stroke (DAS)
Detection
Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)
Visual screening tool
Issue Date2008
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijnurstu
Citation
International Journal Of Nursing Studies, 2008, v. 45 n. 7, p. 1081-1089 How to Cite?
AbstractIn Hong Kong, there is a paucity of evidence to support which tool is superior in measuring depression after stroke (DAS). A simple, non-language-based, culturally neutral, non-verbal and easy to apply tool that is not highly dependent on training will be desirable. Objectives: The present study aimed to examine the clinical utility of three smiley pictures in detecting DAS for older Chinese patients at 1 month after first-ever ischemic stroke. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 253 stroke patients were interviewed by a research nurse at 1-month follow-up. Results: Taking Diagnostic and Statistic Manual (DSM IV) as the gold standard, the measurement properties of emoticon (sad) in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, as well as Kappa's value were found comparable to Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The emoticon (happy) demonstrated a highly significant inverse relationship with all depression assessment tools (p<0.001). It was also found that the emoticon (flat) could capture 98% of all depressed subjects identified by DSM IV, although its predictive values were less satisfactory. Conclusions: The smiley pictures seemed to fulfil the requirements for early and prompt screening among older patients. Cultural implication regarding emotions dissipation among Chinese patients should be further studied. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163174
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.561
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.526
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, ACKen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, SWen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, GKKen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, RTFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:28:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:28:26Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Nursing Studies, 2008, v. 45 n. 7, p. 1081-1089en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7489en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163174-
dc.description.abstractIn Hong Kong, there is a paucity of evidence to support which tool is superior in measuring depression after stroke (DAS). A simple, non-language-based, culturally neutral, non-verbal and easy to apply tool that is not highly dependent on training will be desirable. Objectives: The present study aimed to examine the clinical utility of three smiley pictures in detecting DAS for older Chinese patients at 1 month after first-ever ischemic stroke. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 253 stroke patients were interviewed by a research nurse at 1-month follow-up. Results: Taking Diagnostic and Statistic Manual (DSM IV) as the gold standard, the measurement properties of emoticon (sad) in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, as well as Kappa's value were found comparable to Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The emoticon (happy) demonstrated a highly significant inverse relationship with all depression assessment tools (p<0.001). It was also found that the emoticon (flat) could capture 98% of all depressed subjects identified by DSM IV, although its predictive values were less satisfactory. Conclusions: The smiley pictures seemed to fulfil the requirements for early and prompt screening among older patients. Cultural implication regarding emotions dissipation among Chinese patients should be further studied. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijnurstuen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Nursing Studiesen_US
dc.subjectDepression-
dc.subjectDepression after stroke (DAS)-
dc.subjectDetection-
dc.subjectGeriatric Depression Scale (GDS)-
dc.subjectVisual screening tool-
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression - Diagnosis - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshStroke - Complicationsen_US
dc.titleThe smiley as a simple screening tool for depression after stroke: A preliminary studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, ACK:acklee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, RTF:rtcheung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, ACK=rp00463en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, RTF=rp00434en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2007.05.008en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17707824-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-44949135060en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros127245-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-44949135060&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage1081en_US
dc.identifier.epage1089en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257918000012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, ACK=21834051800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, SW=7403437221en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, GKK=21835274200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, RTF=7202397498en_US

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