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Article: Resting metabolic rate and body fat distribution in obese Chinese women

TitleResting metabolic rate and body fat distribution in obese Chinese women
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fasebj.org/
Citation
Faseb Journal, 1998, v. 12 n. 4, p. A553 How to Cite?
AbstractBody fat distribution is an important predictor of obesity-related complications. Fat distribution pattern may affect the ability to lose weight. Some studies have shown that subjects with lower body obesity (LBO) are more resistant to weight loss than those with upper body obesity (UBO). And this phenomenon has been linked to a higher metabolic rate in UBO subjects than LBO subjects. This findings, however, are not unequivocal. The present study aimed to determine the relationship between resting metabolic rate (RMR) and body fat distribution. This is part of a larger scale study which examines RMR and the ability to lose weight in obese Chinese women. Obese women (41.3 ± 9.6 years old) were divided into three groups according to their waist to hip ratio (WHR): UBO (WHR>0.9, n=12), Intermediate (WHR between 0.85 and 0.9, n=11) and LBO (WHR<0.85, n=11). Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to determine fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM). RMR was measured in overnight fasted subjects by indirect calorimetry. Mean body mass index (BMI) of these subjects was 31.6 (range: 26-34), with no difference between groups. FFM adjusted for age and BMI (43.5, 41.2 and 38.4 kg, respectively, F(2, 29)=6.01, P<0.01) but not FM was significantly different among groups. FFM as percent of body weight decreases as WHR decreases (r=0.53, P<0.01). RMR, adjusted for age and BMI was found to correlate positively with WHR (r=0.4, P<0.05). The correlation no longer holds when RMR was also adjusted for FFM. Thus, compared to UBO, LBO is associated with a decrease in FFM and RMR. Theoretically, to achieve a similar degree of weight loss, subjects with LBO, compared to subjects with UBO, would need to consume less energy and/or maintain a higher level of physical activity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163038
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.299
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.775

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorKung, AWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, ETSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:26:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:26:51Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFaseb Journal, 1998, v. 12 n. 4, p. A553en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0892-6638en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163038-
dc.description.abstractBody fat distribution is an important predictor of obesity-related complications. Fat distribution pattern may affect the ability to lose weight. Some studies have shown that subjects with lower body obesity (LBO) are more resistant to weight loss than those with upper body obesity (UBO). And this phenomenon has been linked to a higher metabolic rate in UBO subjects than LBO subjects. This findings, however, are not unequivocal. The present study aimed to determine the relationship between resting metabolic rate (RMR) and body fat distribution. This is part of a larger scale study which examines RMR and the ability to lose weight in obese Chinese women. Obese women (41.3 ± 9.6 years old) were divided into three groups according to their waist to hip ratio (WHR): UBO (WHR>0.9, n=12), Intermediate (WHR between 0.85 and 0.9, n=11) and LBO (WHR<0.85, n=11). Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to determine fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM). RMR was measured in overnight fasted subjects by indirect calorimetry. Mean body mass index (BMI) of these subjects was 31.6 (range: 26-34), with no difference between groups. FFM adjusted for age and BMI (43.5, 41.2 and 38.4 kg, respectively, F(2, 29)=6.01, P<0.01) but not FM was significantly different among groups. FFM as percent of body weight decreases as WHR decreases (r=0.53, P<0.01). RMR, adjusted for age and BMI was found to correlate positively with WHR (r=0.4, P<0.05). The correlation no longer holds when RMR was also adjusted for FFM. Thus, compared to UBO, LBO is associated with a decrease in FFM and RMR. Theoretically, to achieve a similar degree of weight loss, subjects with LBO, compared to subjects with UBO, would need to consume less energy and/or maintain a higher level of physical activity.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fasebj.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFASEB Journalen_HK
dc.titleResting metabolic rate and body fat distribution in obese Chinese womenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKung, AWC: awckung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, ETS: etsli@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKung, AWC=rp00368en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, ETS=rp00737en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spageA553en_HK
dc.identifier.epageA553en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, M=8635101000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKung, AWC=7102322339en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, ETS=14018169600en_HK

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