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Article: Factors predisposing to bacteremia in bone marrow transplant recipients

TitleFactors predisposing to bacteremia in bone marrow transplant recipients
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/
Citation
Clinical Infectious Diseases, 1997, v. 25 n. 2, p. 438 How to Cite?
AbstractFactors predisposing to bacteremia associated with bone marrow transplantation were studied prospectively. In 256 bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients from 1991-96, there were 75 patients with 80 episodes of bacteremia. Among all bacterial isolates, 68% were Gram positive bacteria. During the pre-engraftment period, the infective focus was identified only in 5% of the cases. The only significant risk factor associated with bacteremia was late stage underlying disease (71% of patients, P<0.05). Other factors, including mucositis, severity of conditioning toxicity, and duration and severity of neutropenia or monocytopenia, were not associated with bacteremia. In 53% of cases, the focus of infection could be identified during the post-engraftment period. Hickman catheter infection and severe acute and chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) were independently associated with bacteremia by multivariate analysis (P<0.001, <0.005 and <0.05 respectively). The risk factors for bacteremia in BMT recipients are therefore different from other cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Thus, in light of these results, early selective use of hematopoietic growth factors in patients with late stage underlying malignancies during pre-engraftment, antimicrobial prophylaxis for acute GVHD with intense immunosuppression, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for chronic GVHD may be helpful.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163017
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.736
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.742

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuk, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, FFEen_US
dc.contributor.authorLie, AKWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiang, RHSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:26:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:26:38Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Infectious Diseases, 1997, v. 25 n. 2, p. 438en_US
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163017-
dc.description.abstractFactors predisposing to bacteremia associated with bone marrow transplantation were studied prospectively. In 256 bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients from 1991-96, there were 75 patients with 80 episodes of bacteremia. Among all bacterial isolates, 68% were Gram positive bacteria. During the pre-engraftment period, the infective focus was identified only in 5% of the cases. The only significant risk factor associated with bacteremia was late stage underlying disease (71% of patients, P<0.05). Other factors, including mucositis, severity of conditioning toxicity, and duration and severity of neutropenia or monocytopenia, were not associated with bacteremia. In 53% of cases, the focus of infection could be identified during the post-engraftment period. Hickman catheter infection and severe acute and chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) were independently associated with bacteremia by multivariate analysis (P<0.001, <0.005 and <0.05 respectively). The risk factors for bacteremia in BMT recipients are therefore different from other cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Thus, in light of these results, early selective use of hematopoietic growth factors in patients with late stage underlying malignancies during pre-engraftment, antimicrobial prophylaxis for acute GVHD with intense immunosuppression, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for chronic GVHD may be helpful.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Infectious Diseasesen_US
dc.titleFactors predisposing to bacteremia in bone marrow transplant recipientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLiang, RHS:rliang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLiang, RHS=rp00345en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748210750en_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage438en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, WK=7005237832en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, CH=36151687600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, FFE=25928259900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLie, AKW=24284842400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, RHS=26643224900en_US

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