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Article: Natural killer-cell malignancies: Diagnosis and treatment

TitleNatural killer-cell malignancies: Diagnosis and treatment
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/leu
Citation
Leukemia, 2005, v. 19 n. 12, p. 2186-2194 How to Cite?
AbstractNatural killer (NK)-cell malignancies are uncommon diseases. Previously known as polymorphic reticulosis or angiocentric T-cell lymphomas, they are classified by the World Health Organization as NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type and aggressive NK-cell leukemia. They are prevalent in Asia and South America, but exceptionally rare in western countries. Pathologically, NK-cell lymphomas show a polymorphic neoplastic infiltrate with an angioinvasive and angiodestructive pattern. Lymphoma cells are characteristically CD2+, CD56+ and cytoplasmic CD3ε+. T-cell receptor gene is germline, and clonal Epstein -Barr virus (EBV) infection is almost invariably. Clinically, they can be divided into nasal, non-nasal, and aggressive lymphoma/leukemia subtypes. Most nasal NK-cell lymphomas present with stage I/II disease, and frontline radiotherapy is the most important key to successful treatment. Many stage I/II patients treated with radiotherapy fail systemically, implying that concomitant chemotherapy may be needed. Chemotherapy is indicated for advanced nasal NK-cell lymphoma, and the non-nasal and aggressive subtypes. However, treatment results are unsatisfactory. High-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be beneficial to selected patients. The International Prognostic Index and presentation EBV DNA load is of prognostic significance and may be useful in the stratification of patients for various treatment modalities. © 2005 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162908
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 12.104
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.142
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwong, YLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:25:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:25:08Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationLeukemia, 2005, v. 19 n. 12, p. 2186-2194en_US
dc.identifier.issn0887-6924en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162908-
dc.description.abstractNatural killer (NK)-cell malignancies are uncommon diseases. Previously known as polymorphic reticulosis or angiocentric T-cell lymphomas, they are classified by the World Health Organization as NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type and aggressive NK-cell leukemia. They are prevalent in Asia and South America, but exceptionally rare in western countries. Pathologically, NK-cell lymphomas show a polymorphic neoplastic infiltrate with an angioinvasive and angiodestructive pattern. Lymphoma cells are characteristically CD2+, CD56+ and cytoplasmic CD3ε+. T-cell receptor gene is germline, and clonal Epstein -Barr virus (EBV) infection is almost invariably. Clinically, they can be divided into nasal, non-nasal, and aggressive lymphoma/leukemia subtypes. Most nasal NK-cell lymphomas present with stage I/II disease, and frontline radiotherapy is the most important key to successful treatment. Many stage I/II patients treated with radiotherapy fail systemically, implying that concomitant chemotherapy may be needed. Chemotherapy is indicated for advanced nasal NK-cell lymphoma, and the non-nasal and aggressive subtypes. However, treatment results are unsatisfactory. High-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be beneficial to selected patients. The International Prognostic Index and presentation EBV DNA load is of prognostic significance and may be useful in the stratification of patients for various treatment modalities. © 2005 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/leuen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLeukemiaen_US
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshHerpesvirus 4, Humanen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshKiller Cells, Natural - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLeukemia - Classification - Diagnosis - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshLymphoma - Classification - Diagnosis - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleNatural killer-cell malignancies: Diagnosis and treatmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwong, YL:ylkwong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, YL=rp00358en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.leu.2403955en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16179910-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-28544444488en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros108033-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-28544444488&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage2186en_US
dc.identifier.epage2194en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233462300020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, YL=7102818954en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike330226-

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