File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Hodgkin's lymphoma in Chinese migrants to British Columbia: A 25-year survey

TitleHodgkin's lymphoma in Chinese migrants to British Columbia: A 25-year survey
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://annonc.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Annals Of Oncology, 2004, v. 15 n. 4, p. 626-630 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Compared with the West, Hodgkin's lymphoma in Oriental countries is characterized by a lower incidence rate and a higher proportion of mixed cellularity histology. Both environmental and genetic factors may be involved. Patients and methods: The incidence and pattern of pathology of Hodgkin's lymphoma in the migrant Chinese population (0.4 million) in British Columbia (population 3.2 million) were studied. From a computerized database, all Hodgkin's lymphoma cases diagnosed in British Columbia from 1970 to 1997 were identified. Chinese descent was determined using patient surname by standard methodology and verified from the treatment record or by patient interview. The corresponding figures from the Chinese population in Hong Kong were used for comparison. For incidence rates, the age-specific incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma in Hong Kong was obtained from the government cancer registry. For comparison of histology subtypes, 200 Hodgkin's lymphoma records from a Hong Kong regional referral center for the same time period were reviewed. Crude and age-standardized incidence rates were calculated by 5-year intervals in terms of age and calendar year, and relative rates were compared between the three populations. Results: From 1970 to 1997, Hodgkin's lymphoma was diagnosed in 34 Chinese patients in BC, with 24 cases diagnosed from 1970 to 1994. Thus, the crude and age-adjusted incidence rates from 1970 to 1994 were 0.91 and 1.14 per 100 000 per year in the British Columbia Chinese migrant population. Within the same period, 1862 cases of Hodgkin's lymphoma were diagnosed in British Columbia, giving a provincial background crude and age-adjusted incidence rates of 5.2 and 4.87 per 100 000 per year. The number of cases in the Hong Kong Chinese population (1970-1994) was 404, giving crude and age-adjusted incidence rates of 0.32 and 0.31 per 100 000 per year, respectively. Corrected for age and calendar year trends, the observed 25-year incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma in British Columbia Chinese was significantly lower than expected from the British Columbia background population [24 observed versus 71 expected cases; standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 0.34; 90% confidence interval (CI) 0.24-0.48; P <0.0001]. On the other hand, it is higher than that expected by extrapolating from the Hong Kong Chinese population (24 observed versus 8.5 expected cases; SIR = 2.81; 90% CI 1.94-3.95; P <0.0001). The difference is mainly accounted for by young patients with nodular sclerosis type disease in the migrant population. Conclusions: Although any conclusion about the impact of migration on Hodgkin's lymphoma incidence and types in the Chinese population must be considered tentative due to the small number of observed cases and confounding variables such as age, changing diagnostic standards and secular trends in Hodgkin's lymphoma rates, our data demonstrate a tendency for the Chinese population of British Columbia to take on a Western pattern of Hodgkin's lymphoma. This observation provides additional evidence that both genetic and environmental influences play a role in the pathogenesis of this lymphoma, and that environmental factors can exert their influence over a relatively short period of time. © 2004 European Society for Medical Oncology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162871
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.362
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, WYen_US
dc.contributor.authorGascoyne, RDen_US
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, REen_US
dc.contributor.authorLe, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorKlasa, RDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiang, RHSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoy, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorFoo, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorConnors, JMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:24:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:24:36Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Oncology, 2004, v. 15 n. 4, p. 626-630en_US
dc.identifier.issn0923-7534en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162871-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Compared with the West, Hodgkin's lymphoma in Oriental countries is characterized by a lower incidence rate and a higher proportion of mixed cellularity histology. Both environmental and genetic factors may be involved. Patients and methods: The incidence and pattern of pathology of Hodgkin's lymphoma in the migrant Chinese population (0.4 million) in British Columbia (population 3.2 million) were studied. From a computerized database, all Hodgkin's lymphoma cases diagnosed in British Columbia from 1970 to 1997 were identified. Chinese descent was determined using patient surname by standard methodology and verified from the treatment record or by patient interview. The corresponding figures from the Chinese population in Hong Kong were used for comparison. For incidence rates, the age-specific incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma in Hong Kong was obtained from the government cancer registry. For comparison of histology subtypes, 200 Hodgkin's lymphoma records from a Hong Kong regional referral center for the same time period were reviewed. Crude and age-standardized incidence rates were calculated by 5-year intervals in terms of age and calendar year, and relative rates were compared between the three populations. Results: From 1970 to 1997, Hodgkin's lymphoma was diagnosed in 34 Chinese patients in BC, with 24 cases diagnosed from 1970 to 1994. Thus, the crude and age-adjusted incidence rates from 1970 to 1994 were 0.91 and 1.14 per 100 000 per year in the British Columbia Chinese migrant population. Within the same period, 1862 cases of Hodgkin's lymphoma were diagnosed in British Columbia, giving a provincial background crude and age-adjusted incidence rates of 5.2 and 4.87 per 100 000 per year. The number of cases in the Hong Kong Chinese population (1970-1994) was 404, giving crude and age-adjusted incidence rates of 0.32 and 0.31 per 100 000 per year, respectively. Corrected for age and calendar year trends, the observed 25-year incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma in British Columbia Chinese was significantly lower than expected from the British Columbia background population [24 observed versus 71 expected cases; standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 0.34; 90% confidence interval (CI) 0.24-0.48; P <0.0001]. On the other hand, it is higher than that expected by extrapolating from the Hong Kong Chinese population (24 observed versus 8.5 expected cases; SIR = 2.81; 90% CI 1.94-3.95; P <0.0001). The difference is mainly accounted for by young patients with nodular sclerosis type disease in the migrant population. Conclusions: Although any conclusion about the impact of migration on Hodgkin's lymphoma incidence and types in the Chinese population must be considered tentative due to the small number of observed cases and confounding variables such as age, changing diagnostic standards and secular trends in Hodgkin's lymphoma rates, our data demonstrate a tendency for the Chinese population of British Columbia to take on a Western pattern of Hodgkin's lymphoma. This observation provides additional evidence that both genetic and environmental influences play a role in the pathogenesis of this lymphoma, and that environmental factors can exert their influence over a relatively short period of time. © 2004 European Society for Medical Oncology.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://annonc.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Oncologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshBritish Columbia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEmigration And Immigrationen_US
dc.subject.meshHodgkin Disease - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_US
dc.titleHodgkin's lymphoma in Chinese migrants to British Columbia: A 25-year surveyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLiang, RHS:rliang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLiang, RHS=rp00345en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/annonc/mdh132en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15033671-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2342430765en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros87675-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2342430765&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage626en_US
dc.identifier.epage630en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220758400016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, WY=7202383089en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGascoyne, RD=7006757172en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGallagher, RE=55239579900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLe, N=24343826800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKlasa, RD=35579791100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, RHS=26643224900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoy, C=7202840937en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFoo, W=7003318564en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConnors, JM=7102927698en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats