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Article: Pulmonary vein isolation using transvenous catheter cryoablation for treatment of atrial fibrillation without risk of pulmonary vein stenosis

TitlePulmonary vein isolation using transvenous catheter cryoablation for treatment of atrial fibrillation without risk of pulmonary vein stenosis
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jac
Citation
Journal Of The American College Of Cardiology, 2003, v. 42 n. 4, p. 752-758 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pulmonary vein (PV) isolation using transvenous cryoablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). BACKGROUND: Although electrical isolation of PVs with radiofrequency energy for the treatment of AF is feasible, it is associated with a significant risk of PV stenosis. Cryoablation is a new alternative therapy allowing ablation of tissue while preserving its underlying architecture. METHODS: In 52 patients with paroxysmal (n = 45) or persistent (n = 7) AF, PV isolation using the CryoCor cryoablation system (CyroCor Inc., San Diego, California) with a 10F deflectable transvenous catheter was performed as guided by ostial PV potentials. Cryoablation was applied twice at each targeted site (2.5 to 5 min/applicatlon). Computed tomography (CT) of the thorax was performed at baseline and at 3 and 12 months to evaluate for PV stenosis. RESULTS: All targeted PVs were completely isolated in 49 (94%) of 52 of patients. Of 152 PVs targeted, 147 (97%) were successfully isolated (mean 3.0 PVs isolated per patient). After a mean period of 12.4 ± 5.5 months of follow-up, 37 (71%) of 52 patients had no recurrence of AF or were clinically improved, including 29 patients (56%) who had no recurrence of AF with (n = 11) or without the use of anti-arrhythmic drugs. At 3 and 12 months, the CT scan showed no evidence of PV stenosis associated with cryoablation in any patients. CONCLUSIONS: Transvenous catheter cryoablation is an effective method to create PV electrical isolation for the treatment of AF. A clinically satisfactory result can be achieved in 71% of patients with AF, without the risk of PV stenosis. © 2003 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162709
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 17.759
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 10.097
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, HFen_US
dc.contributor.authorReek, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorTimmermans, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, KLFen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeller, JCen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorGhaye, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorAyers, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrijns, HJGMen_US
dc.contributor.authorKlein, HUen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, CPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:22:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:22:34Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American College Of Cardiology, 2003, v. 42 n. 4, p. 752-758en_US
dc.identifier.issn0735-1097en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162709-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pulmonary vein (PV) isolation using transvenous cryoablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). BACKGROUND: Although electrical isolation of PVs with radiofrequency energy for the treatment of AF is feasible, it is associated with a significant risk of PV stenosis. Cryoablation is a new alternative therapy allowing ablation of tissue while preserving its underlying architecture. METHODS: In 52 patients with paroxysmal (n = 45) or persistent (n = 7) AF, PV isolation using the CryoCor cryoablation system (CyroCor Inc., San Diego, California) with a 10F deflectable transvenous catheter was performed as guided by ostial PV potentials. Cryoablation was applied twice at each targeted site (2.5 to 5 min/applicatlon). Computed tomography (CT) of the thorax was performed at baseline and at 3 and 12 months to evaluate for PV stenosis. RESULTS: All targeted PVs were completely isolated in 49 (94%) of 52 of patients. Of 152 PVs targeted, 147 (97%) were successfully isolated (mean 3.0 PVs isolated per patient). After a mean period of 12.4 ± 5.5 months of follow-up, 37 (71%) of 52 patients had no recurrence of AF or were clinically improved, including 29 patients (56%) who had no recurrence of AF with (n = 11) or without the use of anti-arrhythmic drugs. At 3 and 12 months, the CT scan showed no evidence of PV stenosis associated with cryoablation in any patients. CONCLUSIONS: Transvenous catheter cryoablation is an effective method to create PV electrical isolation for the treatment of AF. A clinically satisfactory result can be achieved in 71% of patients with AF, without the risk of PV stenosis. © 2003 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jacen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American College of Cardiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAtrial Fibrillation - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshCatheterization - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshConstriction, Pathologic - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshCryosurgery - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Veins - Pathology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titlePulmonary vein isolation using transvenous catheter cryoablation for treatment of atrial fibrillation without risk of pulmonary vein stenosisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, HF:hftse@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, HF=rp00428en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0735-1097(03)00788-5en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12932615-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0041730576en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros100808-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0041730576&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage752en_US
dc.identifier.epage758en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000184780600029-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, HF=7006070805en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReek, S=7003347203en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTimmermans, C=7006153844en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaiFun Lee, K=6504396763en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeller, JC=7202179791en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRodriguez, LM=7402239863en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGhaye, B=7004497406en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAyers, GM=7102015157en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCrijns, HJGM=36079203000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKlein, HU=26642898000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CP=7401968501en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablejt 130913-

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