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Article: Important factors other than dialysis adequacy associated with inadequate dietary protein and energy intakes in patients receiving maintenance peritoneal dialysis.

TitleImportant factors other than dialysis adequacy associated with inadequate dietary protein and energy intakes in patients receiving maintenance peritoneal dialysis.
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherAmerican Society for Nutrition. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajcn.org/
Citation
The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2003, v. 77 n. 4, p. 834-841 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Anorexia that results in inadequate nutrient intake is considered one of the most important causes of malnutrition in dialysis patients. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine factors other than dialysis adequacy that are associated with inadequate protein and energy intakes in patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. DESIGN: Dietary protein and energy intakes were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 266 patients, and factors other than dialysis adequacy that are potentially associated with reductions in energy and protein intakes were examined. RESULTS: Only 39% of the patients had protein intakes > or = 1.2 g x kg(- 1) x d(- 1), and 26% had energy intakes > or = 126 kJ x kg(- 1) x d(- 1). Other than having a greater total urea clearance and glomerular filtration rate, patients with protein intakes > or = 1.2, as opposed to < 1.2, g x kg(- 1) x d(- 1) had lower high-sensitive C-reactive protein concentrations and fewer complications with volume overload (29% compared with 46%; P = 0.006). Patients with energy intakes > or = 126, as opposed to < 126, kJ x kg(- 1) x d(- 1) were younger, had lower high-sensitive C-reactive protein concentrations, and had a lower prevalence of diabetes (P = 0.006), atherosclerotic vascular disease (P = 0.020), and history of volume overload (P = 0.013). Multiple regression analysis showed that other than increasing age, diabetes, and total urea clearance, having a history of volume overload was independently associated with a 0.22-g x kg(- 1) x d(- 1)decrease in protein (P = 0.001) and a 13.07-kJ x kg(- 1) x d(- 1) decrease in energy intake (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: An important yet unrecognized association was observed between a history of volume overload and dietary intake in peritoneal dialysis patients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162679
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.703
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.771
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, AYMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSanderson, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSea, MMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, PKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLui, SFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:22:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:22:16Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2003, v. 77 n. 4, p. 834-841en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9165en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162679-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Anorexia that results in inadequate nutrient intake is considered one of the most important causes of malnutrition in dialysis patients. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine factors other than dialysis adequacy that are associated with inadequate protein and energy intakes in patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. DESIGN: Dietary protein and energy intakes were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 266 patients, and factors other than dialysis adequacy that are potentially associated with reductions in energy and protein intakes were examined. RESULTS: Only 39% of the patients had protein intakes > or = 1.2 g x kg(- 1) x d(- 1), and 26% had energy intakes > or = 126 kJ x kg(- 1) x d(- 1). Other than having a greater total urea clearance and glomerular filtration rate, patients with protein intakes > or = 1.2, as opposed to < 1.2, g x kg(- 1) x d(- 1) had lower high-sensitive C-reactive protein concentrations and fewer complications with volume overload (29% compared with 46%; P = 0.006). Patients with energy intakes > or = 126, as opposed to < 126, kJ x kg(- 1) x d(- 1) were younger, had lower high-sensitive C-reactive protein concentrations, and had a lower prevalence of diabetes (P = 0.006), atherosclerotic vascular disease (P = 0.020), and history of volume overload (P = 0.013). Multiple regression analysis showed that other than increasing age, diabetes, and total urea clearance, having a history of volume overload was independently associated with a 0.22-g x kg(- 1) x d(- 1)decrease in protein (P = 0.001) and a 13.07-kJ x kg(- 1) x d(- 1) decrease in energy intake (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: An important yet unrecognized association was observed between a history of volume overload and dietary intake in peritoneal dialysis patients.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Nutrition. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajcn.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe American journal of clinical nutritionen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAnorexia - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshArteriosclerosis - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Volumeen_US
dc.subject.meshC-Reactive Protein - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetic Nephropathies - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDietary Proteins - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshEchocardiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshEnergy Intakeen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGlomerulonephritis - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHypertension - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNephrosclerosis - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNutrition Disorders - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatoryen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshRenal Insufficiency - Complications - Therapyen_US
dc.titleImportant factors other than dialysis adequacy associated with inadequate dietary protein and energy intakes in patients receiving maintenance peritoneal dialysis.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, M:meiwang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00281en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid12663280-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037395533en_US
dc.identifier.volume77en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage834en_US
dc.identifier.epage841en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181747600014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, AY=13606226000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSanderson, J=7202371250en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSea, MM=6602566931en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=7406690398en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CW=8531362100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, PK=25928016800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLui, SF=7102379144en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, J=36040369400en_US

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