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Article: Obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular diseases

TitleObstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular diseases
Authors
KeywordsCardiovascular Disease
Hypertension
Ischemic Heart Disease
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Issue Date2002
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinpulm.com
Citation
Clinical Pulmonary Medicine, 2002, v. 9 n. 3, p. 171-176 How to Cite?
AbstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and its cardiovascular consequences have attracted considerable attention in recent years. The strong association between OSA and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well documented. OSA may have a pathogenic role in CVD; it may pose an acute adverse physiologic milieu in pre-existent CVD, or it may merely share common etiologic factors, such as obesity, with CVD. These relationships are not mutually exclusive, and there is compelling evidence that all three components may exist. Many pathophysiologic events in OSA can affect the cardiovascular system, notably acute recurrent hypoxia, intrathoracic pressure swings, and sympathetic discharge. A causal role of OSA in hypertension (HT) is consistently supported by several recently published community-based studies. Epidemiologic studies and clinical series also suggest adverse effects of OSA on left ventricular function and ischemic heart disease. With the currently available evidence, routine laboratory screening for OSA in all patients with cardiovascular disorder is not justified, but clinicians are encouraged to take detailed sleep histories in such patients and refer them for definitive sleep studies if OSA is suspected. The threshold for treatment of OSA in the light of potential cardiovascular morbidity is not universally agreed upon, and there are different schools of thought regarding criteria for treatment in those without significant symptoms directly attributed to OSA. However, common wisdom would suggest that the severity of sleep disordered breathing and the severity of any pre-existing cardiovascular disease will be the determinants for management in individual cases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162576
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.178
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:21:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:21:21Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Pulmonary Medicine, 2002, v. 9 n. 3, p. 171-176en_US
dc.identifier.issn1068-0640en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162576-
dc.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and its cardiovascular consequences have attracted considerable attention in recent years. The strong association between OSA and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well documented. OSA may have a pathogenic role in CVD; it may pose an acute adverse physiologic milieu in pre-existent CVD, or it may merely share common etiologic factors, such as obesity, with CVD. These relationships are not mutually exclusive, and there is compelling evidence that all three components may exist. Many pathophysiologic events in OSA can affect the cardiovascular system, notably acute recurrent hypoxia, intrathoracic pressure swings, and sympathetic discharge. A causal role of OSA in hypertension (HT) is consistently supported by several recently published community-based studies. Epidemiologic studies and clinical series also suggest adverse effects of OSA on left ventricular function and ischemic heart disease. With the currently available evidence, routine laboratory screening for OSA in all patients with cardiovascular disorder is not justified, but clinicians are encouraged to take detailed sleep histories in such patients and refer them for definitive sleep studies if OSA is suspected. The threshold for treatment of OSA in the light of potential cardiovascular morbidity is not universally agreed upon, and there are different schools of thought regarding criteria for treatment in those without significant symptoms directly attributed to OSA. However, common wisdom would suggest that the severity of sleep disordered breathing and the severity of any pre-existing cardiovascular disease will be the determinants for management in individual cases.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinpulm.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Pulmonary Medicineen_US
dc.rightsClinical Pulmonary Medicine. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.-
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectHypertensionen_US
dc.subjectIschemic Heart Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectObstructive Sleep Apneaen_US
dc.titleObstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular diseasesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM:msmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036099690en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros69089-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036099690&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage171en_US
dc.identifier.epage176en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, B=9246012800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, MSM=7102423259en_US

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