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Article: Differential expression of manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase in lung cancer

TitleDifferential expression of manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase in lung cancer
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/
Citation
Cancer Research, 2001, v. 61 n. 23, p. 8578-8585 How to Cite?
AbstractReactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in the initiation and promotion of cells to neoplastic growth. In this context, cigarette smoke exposure, the primary risk factor in lung cancer development, leads to high levels of ROS within the human airway. Although well-equipped with an integrated antioxidant defense system consisting of low-molecular weight antioxidants such as glutathione and intracellular enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, the lungs are vulnerable to increased endogenous and exogenous oxidative insults. Antioxidants increase in response to oxidative stress and minimize ROS-induced injury in experimental systems, indicating that antioxidant levels may determine whether ROS can initiate lung carcinogenesis. On this basis, we hypothesized that antioxidants would be decreased in lung carcinoma cells as compared with tumor-free adjacent lung tissues. Antioxidant expression was evaluated in 16 lung tumor and 21 tumor-free lung tissues collected between the years 1993 and 2001 from 24 individuals with surgically resectable non-small cell lung cancer, i.e., adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Total SOD activity was increased (P = 0.035), catalase activity decreased (P = 0.002), and glutathione and glutathione peroxidase were similar in tumors compared with tumor-free lung tissues. Alterations in antioxidant activities were attributable to increased manganese SOD and decreased catalase protein and mRNA expression in tumors. Immunohistochemical localization of catalase in the lung revealed decreased or no expression in the tumor cells, although healthy adjacent airway epithelial cells were strongly positive for catalase. Parallel changes in antioxidant activities, protein, and mRNA expression were noted in A549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 1β, and IFN-γ). Thus, inflammation in the lung may contribute to high levels of manganese SOD and decreased catalase, which together may lead to increased hydrogen peroxide intracellularly and create an intracellular environment favorable to DNA damage and the promotion of cancer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162540
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.556
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.372
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, JCMen_US
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorComhair, SAAen_US
dc.contributor.authorFarver, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorErzurum, SCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:20:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:20:54Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationCancer Research, 2001, v. 61 n. 23, p. 8578-8585en_US
dc.identifier.issn0008-5472en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162540-
dc.description.abstractReactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in the initiation and promotion of cells to neoplastic growth. In this context, cigarette smoke exposure, the primary risk factor in lung cancer development, leads to high levels of ROS within the human airway. Although well-equipped with an integrated antioxidant defense system consisting of low-molecular weight antioxidants such as glutathione and intracellular enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, the lungs are vulnerable to increased endogenous and exogenous oxidative insults. Antioxidants increase in response to oxidative stress and minimize ROS-induced injury in experimental systems, indicating that antioxidant levels may determine whether ROS can initiate lung carcinogenesis. On this basis, we hypothesized that antioxidants would be decreased in lung carcinoma cells as compared with tumor-free adjacent lung tissues. Antioxidant expression was evaluated in 16 lung tumor and 21 tumor-free lung tissues collected between the years 1993 and 2001 from 24 individuals with surgically resectable non-small cell lung cancer, i.e., adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Total SOD activity was increased (P = 0.035), catalase activity decreased (P = 0.002), and glutathione and glutathione peroxidase were similar in tumors compared with tumor-free lung tissues. Alterations in antioxidant activities were attributable to increased manganese SOD and decreased catalase protein and mRNA expression in tumors. Immunohistochemical localization of catalase in the lung revealed decreased or no expression in the tumor cells, although healthy adjacent airway epithelial cells were strongly positive for catalase. Parallel changes in antioxidant activities, protein, and mRNA expression were noted in A549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 1β, and IFN-γ). Thus, inflammation in the lung may contribute to high levels of manganese SOD and decreased catalase, which together may lead to increased hydrogen peroxide intracellularly and create an intracellular environment favorable to DNA damage and the promotion of cancer.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofCancer Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - Enzymology - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshCatalase - Biosynthesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms - Enzymology - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Messenger - Biosynthesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSuperoxide Dismutase - Biosynthesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.titleDifferential expression of manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase in lung canceren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, JCM:jhocm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, JCM=rp00258en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid11731445en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035577304en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035577304&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume61en_US
dc.identifier.issue23en_US
dc.identifier.spage8578en_US
dc.identifier.epage8585en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, JCM=7402649981en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZheng, S=7403146169en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridComhair, SAA=6603469592en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFarver, C=7003693695en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridErzurum, SC=7005108319en_US

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