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Article: Clarithromycin for Helicobacter pylori infection

TitleClarithromycin for Helicobacter pylori infection
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.expertopin.com/loi/eop
Citation
Expert Opinion On Pharmacotherapy, 2000, v. 1 n. 3, p. 507-514 How to Cite?
AbstractHelicobacter pylori, a Gram-negative organism that survives in the deep mucus layer and attaches to the gastric surface cells, is estimated to be present in up to one-half of the US population. Chronic H. pylori infection causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer diseases and even gastric cancer. Cure of the infection leads to healing of gastric inflammation, prevention of development of peptic ulcer, as well as accelerated healing of peptic ulcers, and prevention of ulcer recurrence. Treatment of H. pylori has undergone substantial evolution over the past decade. Despite the in vitro susceptibility, results from single or even dual drug therapy is typically unsatisfactory and the best therapy is yet to be defined. The best current therapies for H. pylori infection consist of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or ranitidine bismuth citrate and two antibiotics (triple therapies), or bismuth, tetracycline, metronidazole and a PPI (quadruple therapy). Clarithromycin is one of the most useful antimicrobials against H. pylori. It is an acid-stable macrolide with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, well absorbed with a wide tissue distribution and with mild side effects. Clarithromycin has a low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50) for H. pylori and its effect is potentiated by acid inhibition. When combined with a PPI or ranitidine bismuth citrate and amoxicillin or metronidazole, eradication rates of more than 95% can be achieved with susceptible organisms. However, the prevalence of primary and acquired clarithromycin resistance, which is due to mutations within a conserved loop of 23S rRNA of H. pylori, is increasing. In practice, the presence of clarithromycin resistance usually implies reduced success when clarithromycin-containing regimes are used. There is a need for improved therapies for H. pylori where antibiotic resistance is less of a problem. 2000 © Ashley Publications Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162432
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.543
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.884
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorGraham, DYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:19:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:19:52Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationExpert Opinion On Pharmacotherapy, 2000, v. 1 n. 3, p. 507-514en_US
dc.identifier.issn1465-6566en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162432-
dc.description.abstractHelicobacter pylori, a Gram-negative organism that survives in the deep mucus layer and attaches to the gastric surface cells, is estimated to be present in up to one-half of the US population. Chronic H. pylori infection causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer diseases and even gastric cancer. Cure of the infection leads to healing of gastric inflammation, prevention of development of peptic ulcer, as well as accelerated healing of peptic ulcers, and prevention of ulcer recurrence. Treatment of H. pylori has undergone substantial evolution over the past decade. Despite the in vitro susceptibility, results from single or even dual drug therapy is typically unsatisfactory and the best therapy is yet to be defined. The best current therapies for H. pylori infection consist of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or ranitidine bismuth citrate and two antibiotics (triple therapies), or bismuth, tetracycline, metronidazole and a PPI (quadruple therapy). Clarithromycin is one of the most useful antimicrobials against H. pylori. It is an acid-stable macrolide with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, well absorbed with a wide tissue distribution and with mild side effects. Clarithromycin has a low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50) for H. pylori and its effect is potentiated by acid inhibition. When combined with a PPI or ranitidine bismuth citrate and amoxicillin or metronidazole, eradication rates of more than 95% can be achieved with susceptible organisms. However, the prevalence of primary and acquired clarithromycin resistance, which is due to mutations within a conserved loop of 23S rRNA of H. pylori, is increasing. In practice, the presence of clarithromycin resistance usually implies reduced success when clarithromycin-containing regimes are used. There is a need for improved therapies for H. pylori where antibiotic resistance is less of a problem. 2000 © Ashley Publications Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.expertopin.com/loi/eopen_US
dc.relation.ispartofExpert Opinion on Pharmacotherapyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents - Pharmacology - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshClarithromycin - Pharmacology - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshClinical Trials As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshHelicobacter Infections - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshHelicobacter Pylori - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.titleClarithromycin for Helicobacter pylori infectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, WK:waikleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, WK=rp01479en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid11249534en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034157894en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034157894&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume1en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage507en_US
dc.identifier.epage514en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, WK=7201504523en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGraham, DY=7403477677en_US

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