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Article: Profile of sex hormones in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

TitleProfile of sex hormones in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://lup.sagepub.com
Citation
Lupus, 2000, v. 9 n. 4, p. 252-257 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To study the profile of sex hormones in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Method: Serum prolactin (PRL), testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were obtained from 35 males with SLE and compared with 33 age-matched normal controls. Results: No significant differences in serum T, E2, PRL levels and E2/T ratio were observed between male SLE patients and controls. However, patients with SLE had significantly higher levels of gonadotrophins (FSH, LH). Five (14%) SLE patients, but none of the controls, had both low testosterone and elevated LH. Hypoandrogenic male SLE patients did not have overt features of hypogonadism but had a higher prevalence of central nervous system disease and serositis than those with normal androgen levels. Disease flares, on the other hand, were not significantly more frequent in those patients. Although PRL or T levels per se did not correlate with disease activity in our patients, the ratio of PRL to T showed a significant correlation with SLEDAI scores (ρ = 0.47, P = 0.01). Conclusions: Hypoandrogenism is present in some male patients with SLE and may be relevant in disease pathogenesis. However, whether these hormonal abnormalities are intrinsic to SLE or the consequence of any non-specific chronic disorders cannot be distinguished from the current data. Further studies involving a larger number of subjects and inclusion of other disease controls are needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162418
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.118
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.878
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, CCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, CSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:19:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:19:45Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationLupus, 2000, v. 9 n. 4, p. 252-257en_US
dc.identifier.issn0961-2033en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162418-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To study the profile of sex hormones in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Method: Serum prolactin (PRL), testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were obtained from 35 males with SLE and compared with 33 age-matched normal controls. Results: No significant differences in serum T, E2, PRL levels and E2/T ratio were observed between male SLE patients and controls. However, patients with SLE had significantly higher levels of gonadotrophins (FSH, LH). Five (14%) SLE patients, but none of the controls, had both low testosterone and elevated LH. Hypoandrogenic male SLE patients did not have overt features of hypogonadism but had a higher prevalence of central nervous system disease and serositis than those with normal androgen levels. Disease flares, on the other hand, were not significantly more frequent in those patients. Although PRL or T levels per se did not correlate with disease activity in our patients, the ratio of PRL to T showed a significant correlation with SLEDAI scores (ρ = 0.47, P = 0.01). Conclusions: Hypoandrogenism is present in some male patients with SLE and may be relevant in disease pathogenesis. However, whether these hormonal abnormalities are intrinsic to SLE or the consequence of any non-specific chronic disorders cannot be distinguished from the current data. Further studies involving a larger number of subjects and inclusion of other disease controls are needed.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://lup.sagepub.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLupusen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshEstradiol - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshFollicle Stimulating Hormone - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshGonadal Steroid Hormones - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHypogonadism - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshLupus Erythematosus, Systemic - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshLuteinizing Hormone - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshProlactin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshTestosterone - Blooden_US
dc.titleProfile of sex hormones in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, CS:cslau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CS=rp01348en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1191/096120300680198926-
dc.identifier.pmid10866095-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034059357en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034059357&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage252en_US
dc.identifier.epage257en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000087406100004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, CC=7102344226en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CS=14035682100en_US

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