File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: Lung function reference values in Chinese children and adolescents in Hong Kong: I. Spirometric values and comparison with other populations

TitleLung function reference values in Chinese children and adolescents in Hong Kong: I. Spirometric values and comparison with other populations
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org
Citation
American Journal Of Respiratory And Critical Care Medicine, 2000, v. 162 n. 2 I, p. 424-429 How to Cite?
AbstractAs part of a comprehensive evaluation of lung function in Hong Kong-born Chinese children and adolescents, this study was conducted to determine updated prediction equations for spirometry, to evaluate the secular changes of lung function during the past decade, and to compare these results with other data sets. The results are based on 852 (392 male, 460 female) healthy students, age 7 to 19 yr, recruited from seven schools in Hong Kong. All were born and lived in Hong Kong, nonsmokers, free from past or present symptoms or diseases affecting the respiratory tract. A body plethysmograph was used to record lung function measurements. Natural logarithmic values of lung volumes and body height were used in the final regression model. Prediction equations for FVC, FEV1, and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the FVC (MEF50) for both sexes are presented, with standing height as the dependent variable. Compared with Hong Kong data from 1985, the results show a significant increase in height-corrected FVC and FEV1 in both boys and girls, over the whole height range. Compared with recent data of whites, FVC in boys were 8 to 10% lower in the study population, and the difference increased to 12% above the 165 cm height ranges, while FVC in Chinese girls had similar or only slightly lower predicted values. FEV1 values showed a similar pattern with lesser difference between the two ethnic groups. Compared with recent data from Chinese children in Singapore, a similar pattern with overall lesser difference of the two populations was present in boys, whereas there was no significant difference between girls in the two places. Our findings support the conclusion that exogenous factors may contribute significantly to the differences in lung function values among ethnic groups and that it is important to examine normative values of various populations for secular trends.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162384
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 13.118
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.832
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, EMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, JPEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeong, JCYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:19:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:19:28Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Respiratory And Critical Care Medicine, 2000, v. 162 n. 2 I, p. 424-429en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1073-449Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162384-
dc.description.abstractAs part of a comprehensive evaluation of lung function in Hong Kong-born Chinese children and adolescents, this study was conducted to determine updated prediction equations for spirometry, to evaluate the secular changes of lung function during the past decade, and to compare these results with other data sets. The results are based on 852 (392 male, 460 female) healthy students, age 7 to 19 yr, recruited from seven schools in Hong Kong. All were born and lived in Hong Kong, nonsmokers, free from past or present symptoms or diseases affecting the respiratory tract. A body plethysmograph was used to record lung function measurements. Natural logarithmic values of lung volumes and body height were used in the final regression model. Prediction equations for FVC, FEV1, and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the FVC (MEF50) for both sexes are presented, with standing height as the dependent variable. Compared with Hong Kong data from 1985, the results show a significant increase in height-corrected FVC and FEV1 in both boys and girls, over the whole height range. Compared with recent data of whites, FVC in boys were 8 to 10% lower in the study population, and the difference increased to 12% above the 165 cm height ranges, while FVC in Chinese girls had similar or only slightly lower predicted values. FEV1 values showed a similar pattern with lesser difference between the two ethnic groups. Compared with recent data from Chinese children in Singapore, a similar pattern with overall lesser difference of the two populations was present in boys, whereas there was no significant difference between girls in the two places. Our findings support the conclusion that exogenous factors may contribute significantly to the differences in lung function values among ethnic groups and that it is important to examine normative values of various populations for secular trends.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajrccm.atsjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicineen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshForced Expiratory Volumeen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaximal Expiratory Flow Rateen_US
dc.subject.meshPlethysmographyen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_US
dc.subject.meshSpirometryen_US
dc.subject.meshVital Capacityen_US
dc.titleLung function reference values in Chinese children and adolescents in Hong Kong: I. Spirometric values and comparison with other populationsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM: msmip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, JPE: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hcm21000@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, JPE=rp00400en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1164/ajrccm.162.2.9905057-
dc.identifier.pmid10934064-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033837304en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros51371-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033837304&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume162en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2 Ien_HK
dc.identifier.spage424en_HK
dc.identifier.epage429en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, MSM=7102423259en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, EM=6602255610en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, JPE=7005218406en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KDK=7201921573en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeong, JCY=35560782200en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats