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Article: Prevalence and distribution of Helicobacter pylori in gastroesophageal reflux disease: A study from the east

TitlePrevalence and distribution of Helicobacter pylori in gastroesophageal reflux disease: A study from the east
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.html
Citation
American Journal Of Gastroenterology, 1999, v. 94 n. 7, p. 1790-1794 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: The relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroesophageal reflux (H. pylori) disease (GERD) is controversial. In Asian populations, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is high and GERD is relatively uncommon. The aim of this study was 1) to test the hypothesis that H. pylori protects the esophagus against GERD, and 2) to study the pattern of H. pylori colonization and gastritis in GERD. METHODS: We conducted a prospective case-control study in which patients with GERD and asymptomatic controls were compared for the prevalence of H. pylori infection. Diagnosis of GERD was based on symptoms of heartburn that improved with acid- suppressive therapy and/or endoscopic evidence of erosive esophagitis. H. pylori status was determined by serology and, when endoscopy was indicated, was confirmed by rapid urease test and histology. Gastric biopsies were examined under hematoxylin and eosin and Giemsa stains. Density of H. pylori colonization and activity of gastritis at different parts of stomach were graded and compared according to Updated Sydney system. RESULTS: A total of 106 patients with GERD and 120 age-and sex-matched, asymptomatic controls were enrolled. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly lower in GERD patients (31%) compared with controls (61%, p < 0.001, odds ratio 0.229, 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.41). H. pylori-infected GERD patients showed significantly more severe gastritis in the antrum than in other parts of stomach (mean inflammatory scores: antrum; 3.3 ± 1.63, body; 1.85 ± 1.31; fundus; 1.65 ± 0.58; cardia, 1.65 ± 1.39; p < 0.005). H. pylori colonization was found less commonly and at lower density at the cardia compared with other parts of the stomach. CONCLUSIONS: H. pylori infection protects against the development of GERD, and carditis is unlikely to play an important role.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162336
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 10.383
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.946
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, JCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorSung, JJYen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, EKWen_US
dc.contributor.authorGo, MYYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, WBen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, FKLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, SCSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:19:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:19:06Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Gastroenterology, 1999, v. 94 n. 7, p. 1790-1794en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9270en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162336-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroesophageal reflux (H. pylori) disease (GERD) is controversial. In Asian populations, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is high and GERD is relatively uncommon. The aim of this study was 1) to test the hypothesis that H. pylori protects the esophagus against GERD, and 2) to study the pattern of H. pylori colonization and gastritis in GERD. METHODS: We conducted a prospective case-control study in which patients with GERD and asymptomatic controls were compared for the prevalence of H. pylori infection. Diagnosis of GERD was based on symptoms of heartburn that improved with acid- suppressive therapy and/or endoscopic evidence of erosive esophagitis. H. pylori status was determined by serology and, when endoscopy was indicated, was confirmed by rapid urease test and histology. Gastric biopsies were examined under hematoxylin and eosin and Giemsa stains. Density of H. pylori colonization and activity of gastritis at different parts of stomach were graded and compared according to Updated Sydney system. RESULTS: A total of 106 patients with GERD and 120 age-and sex-matched, asymptomatic controls were enrolled. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly lower in GERD patients (31%) compared with controls (61%, p < 0.001, odds ratio 0.229, 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.41). H. pylori-infected GERD patients showed significantly more severe gastritis in the antrum than in other parts of stomach (mean inflammatory scores: antrum; 3.3 ± 1.63, body; 1.85 ± 1.31; fundus; 1.65 ± 0.58; cardia, 1.65 ± 1.39; p < 0.005). H. pylori colonization was found less commonly and at lower density at the cardia compared with other parts of the stomach. CONCLUSIONS: H. pylori infection protects against the development of GERD, and carditis is unlikely to play an important role.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Gastroenterologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGastritis - Complications - Epidemiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGastroesophageal Reflux - Complications - Epidemiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHelicobacter Infections - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHelicobacter Pylorien_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.titlePrevalence and distribution of Helicobacter pylori in gastroesophageal reflux disease: A study from the easten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, WK:waikleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, WK=rp01479en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1572-0241.1999.01207.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid10406236-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033022317en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033022317&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume94en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage1790en_US
dc.identifier.epage1794en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, JCY=7409253910en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSung, JJY=35405352400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, EKW=7201647539en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGo, MYY=7101882939en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, WB=7403918293en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, FKL=7202586434en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, WK=7201504523en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoi, CL=8041471300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, SCS=37042903800en_US

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