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Article: Distribution of corticotropin-releasing hormone promoter polymorphism in different ethnic groups: Evidence for natural selection in human populations

TitleDistribution of corticotropin-releasing hormone promoter polymorphism in different ethnic groups: Evidence for natural selection in human populations
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00251/index.htm
Citation
Immunogenetics, 1999, v. 49 n. 10, p. 894-899 How to Cite?
AbstractThe regulatory region of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is highly conserved across species and plays a crucial role in the response of the organism to stress. Release of CRH initiates a cascade of events leading to the release of cortisol and the regulation of inflammatory and immune events. In this report we describe polymorphisms in the 5' regulatory region of the CRH gene in humans. We studied the distribution of CRH alleles in three different African populations, in white UK Caucasoids, and in a Chinese population. In the African and UK populations we found three new polymorphisms which cosegregated resulting in two alleles, A1 and A2. Gene frequencies for A1 and A2 were extremely divergent between the African and the UK populations. The African A1 frequency ranged from 0.27-0.3, while the UK Caucasoid frequency was 0.9. Compound alleles could be assigned by taking into account the previously described biallelic polymorphism at position 225 in the CRH promoter. The A2B1 compound allele is the commonest in contemporary African human populations (allele frequency range 0.44-0.61) and was the only allele observed in a population of chimpanzees from Sierra Leone. Wright's F(ST) for the A2B1 allele over the four sampled populations was 0.612, a value exceeded in human populations only by loci which have apparently been subject to natural selection. Taken together, these findings support A2B1 as the ancestral allele and suggest that the CRH genomic region may have been subject to strong disruptive selection throughout human evolution.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162297
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.303
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.557
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBaerwald, CGOen_US
dc.contributor.authorMok, CCen_US
dc.contributor.authorFife, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorTikly, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWordsworth, BPen_US
dc.contributor.authorOllier, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorPanayi, GSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLanchbury, JSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:18:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:18:44Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationImmunogenetics, 1999, v. 49 n. 10, p. 894-899en_US
dc.identifier.issn0093-7711en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162297-
dc.description.abstractThe regulatory region of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is highly conserved across species and plays a crucial role in the response of the organism to stress. Release of CRH initiates a cascade of events leading to the release of cortisol and the regulation of inflammatory and immune events. In this report we describe polymorphisms in the 5' regulatory region of the CRH gene in humans. We studied the distribution of CRH alleles in three different African populations, in white UK Caucasoids, and in a Chinese population. In the African and UK populations we found three new polymorphisms which cosegregated resulting in two alleles, A1 and A2. Gene frequencies for A1 and A2 were extremely divergent between the African and the UK populations. The African A1 frequency ranged from 0.27-0.3, while the UK Caucasoid frequency was 0.9. Compound alleles could be assigned by taking into account the previously described biallelic polymorphism at position 225 in the CRH promoter. The A2B1 compound allele is the commonest in contemporary African human populations (allele frequency range 0.44-0.61) and was the only allele observed in a population of chimpanzees from Sierra Leone. Wright's F(ST) for the A2B1 allele over the four sampled populations was 0.612, a value exceeded in human populations only by loci which have apparently been subject to natural selection. Taken together, these findings support A2B1 as the ancestral allele and suggest that the CRH genomic region may have been subject to strong disruptive selection throughout human evolution.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00251/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofImmunogeneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAfrican Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAllelesen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBase Sequenceen_US
dc.subject.meshContinental Population Groups - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshCorticotropin-Releasing Hormone - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Primers - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshEvolution, Molecularen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Frequencyen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetic Variationen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPan Troglodytes - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshPromoter Regions, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshSelection, Geneticen_US
dc.titleDistribution of corticotropin-releasing hormone promoter polymorphism in different ethnic groups: Evidence for natural selection in human populationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, CS:cslau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CS=rp01348en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s002510050570en_US
dc.identifier.pmid10436184-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032773616en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032773616&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume49en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage894en_US
dc.identifier.epage899en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000082144000010-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaerwald, CGO=7003454641en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, CC=34668219600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFife, MS=6602168515en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTikly, M=7004118459en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CS=14035682100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWordsworth, BP=7005895666en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOllier, B=6701769237en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPanayi, GS=7102074348en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLanchbury, JS=7004804446en_US

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