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Article: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: An experience in Chinese adults in Hong Kong

TitleObstructive sleep apnea syndrome: An experience in Chinese adults in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherChinese Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cmj.org/
Citation
Chinese Medical Journal, 1998, v. 111 n. 3, p. 257-260 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective Epidemiologic studies in Caucasian populations suggested that symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurred at a prevalence of 1-10%. The condition has been increasingly recognised among the Chinese in Hong Kong. We therefore, summarize our experience with OSA at the Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong at Queen Mary Hospital from 1985-1996. Methods All clinic records concerning demographic data, anthropometric data, clinical features, polysomnographic findings and treatment were reviewed. Results One hundred and twenty-two patients were diagnosed to have OSA. Demographic and clinical features were similar to Caucasian data with a male predominance of 84%, a mean age of about 50 years, and obesity as a risk factor at a mean body mass index of 30.4, which was higher than that of the average local population, although lower than that of OSA patients in Caucasian series. About 27% of the patients have a body mass index (BMI) similar to or below the population average. Nearly all were habitual snorers, and the majority had excessive daytime sleepiness. On polysomnography, the mean apnea-hypopnea index was 38. Common associated medical conditions were hypertension (34%), diabetes mellitus (10%), ischemic heart disease (9%), hyperlipidemia (6%). Most patients were managed successfully with nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Treatment with oral appliances for milder cases is being explored. Conclusions OSA has been increasingly recognised among Chinese adults in Hong Kong in the past decade. Demographic features were similar to Caucasian data. The majority of patients were overweight, although 27% were not, and further investigation on the contribution of faciomaxillary morphology to OSA in this group is warranted.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162248
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.957
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.428
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp Mary, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsang, WTKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:18:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:18:23Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationChinese Medical Journal, 1998, v. 111 n. 3, p. 257-260en_US
dc.identifier.issn0366-6999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162248-
dc.description.abstractObjective Epidemiologic studies in Caucasian populations suggested that symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurred at a prevalence of 1-10%. The condition has been increasingly recognised among the Chinese in Hong Kong. We therefore, summarize our experience with OSA at the Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong at Queen Mary Hospital from 1985-1996. Methods All clinic records concerning demographic data, anthropometric data, clinical features, polysomnographic findings and treatment were reviewed. Results One hundred and twenty-two patients were diagnosed to have OSA. Demographic and clinical features were similar to Caucasian data with a male predominance of 84%, a mean age of about 50 years, and obesity as a risk factor at a mean body mass index of 30.4, which was higher than that of the average local population, although lower than that of OSA patients in Caucasian series. About 27% of the patients have a body mass index (BMI) similar to or below the population average. Nearly all were habitual snorers, and the majority had excessive daytime sleepiness. On polysomnography, the mean apnea-hypopnea index was 38. Common associated medical conditions were hypertension (34%), diabetes mellitus (10%), ischemic heart disease (9%), hyperlipidemia (6%). Most patients were managed successfully with nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Treatment with oral appliances for milder cases is being explored. Conclusions OSA has been increasingly recognised among Chinese adults in Hong Kong in the past decade. Demographic features were similar to Caucasian data. The majority of patients were overweight, although 27% were not, and further investigation on the contribution of faciomaxillary morphology to OSA in this group is warranted.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherChinese Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cmj.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Medical Journalen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHypertension - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea Syndromes - Complications - Epidemiology - Therapyen_US
dc.titleObstructive sleep apnea syndrome: An experience in Chinese adults in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailIp Mary, SM:msmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp Mary, SM=rp00347en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid10374429en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032010036en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros33142-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032010036&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume111en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage257en_US
dc.identifier.epage260en_US
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp Mary, SM=7102423259en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, WTK=7201558636en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, WK=7203021937en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, B=9246012800en_US

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