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Article: Improved treatment outcome in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia using the intensive German protocol, a preliminary report

TitleImproved treatment outcome in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia using the intensive German protocol, a preliminary report
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/3182
Citation
Hematological Oncology, 1997, v. 15 n. 1, p. 19-26 How to Cite?
AbstractThirty-nine consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were treated with an intensive chemotherapy protocol. There were 23 males and 16 females with a median age of 37 years (range: 15-65). Eighteen patients had common ALL, seven had pre-B ALL, three early-precursor B ALL, seven T-ALL and four had aberrant expression of myeloid antigens (c-ALL in three and pre-B ALL in one). The median initial leukocyte count was 11.8 x 10 9/l (range: 0.65-295). Cytogenetic result of the marrow was available in 16 of 39 patients (41 per cent) and showed Philadelphia positivity in six, a normal result in six and one each of t(4,11), t(1,19), hyperdiploidy and del 12p. Hepatosplenomegaly was present in about 20 per cent of the patients. L- Asparaginase-related hepatic toxicity was the commonest toxicity (48.7 per cent) during phase I of induction. Prolonged pancytopenia and hypoplastic death were common during phase II. With the use of growth factors during the neutropenic period of phase II induction, the rate of hypoplastic death was reduced from 40 per cent to 3 per cent. Common causes of treatment failure included early hypoplastic death (27.8 per cent) and leukemia relapses (50 per cent) while primary refractory leukemia, hepatic failure and perforated peptic ulcer contributed to 11.1, 5.5 and 5.5 per cent of the other deaths. A high complete remission (CR) rate (87.4 per cent) was achieved after phase I induction. The median event-free survival (EFS) was 8 months and the 3-year event-free survival was 43 per cent. This result compared favourably to the other regimens previously employed in our institution. In conclusion, satisfactory survival can be achieved with this intensive regimen. Good supportive care was however, essential to minimize toxicities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162189
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.494
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.767
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChim, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwong, YLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, YCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, YTen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:17:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:17:54Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationHematological Oncology, 1997, v. 15 n. 1, p. 19-26en_US
dc.identifier.issn0278-0232en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162189-
dc.description.abstractThirty-nine consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were treated with an intensive chemotherapy protocol. There were 23 males and 16 females with a median age of 37 years (range: 15-65). Eighteen patients had common ALL, seven had pre-B ALL, three early-precursor B ALL, seven T-ALL and four had aberrant expression of myeloid antigens (c-ALL in three and pre-B ALL in one). The median initial leukocyte count was 11.8 x 10 9/l (range: 0.65-295). Cytogenetic result of the marrow was available in 16 of 39 patients (41 per cent) and showed Philadelphia positivity in six, a normal result in six and one each of t(4,11), t(1,19), hyperdiploidy and del 12p. Hepatosplenomegaly was present in about 20 per cent of the patients. L- Asparaginase-related hepatic toxicity was the commonest toxicity (48.7 per cent) during phase I of induction. Prolonged pancytopenia and hypoplastic death were common during phase II. With the use of growth factors during the neutropenic period of phase II induction, the rate of hypoplastic death was reduced from 40 per cent to 3 per cent. Common causes of treatment failure included early hypoplastic death (27.8 per cent) and leukemia relapses (50 per cent) while primary refractory leukemia, hepatic failure and perforated peptic ulcer contributed to 11.1, 5.5 and 5.5 per cent of the other deaths. A high complete remission (CR) rate (87.4 per cent) was achieved after phase I induction. The median event-free survival (EFS) was 8 months and the 3-year event-free survival was 43 per cent. This result compared favourably to the other regimens previously employed in our institution. In conclusion, satisfactory survival can be achieved with this intensive regimen. Good supportive care was however, essential to minimize toxicities.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/3182en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHematological Oncologyen_US
dc.rightsHematological Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.rightsHematological Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - Adverse Effects - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshAsparaginase - Administration & Dosage - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleImproved treatment outcome in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia using the intensive German protocol, a preliminary reporten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChim, CS:jcschim@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKwong, YL:ylkwong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLiang, R:rliang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChim, CS=rp00408en_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, YL=rp00358en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLiang, R=rp00345en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1099-1069(199702)15:1<19::AID-HON591>3.0.CO;2-Gen_US
dc.identifier.pmid9378468-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030885478en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros28472-
dc.identifier.hkuros29911-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030885478&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage19en_US
dc.identifier.epage26en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997XY64900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChim, CS=7004597253en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, YL=7102818954en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, YC=55209144200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CH=9940314800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YT=19834151300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, R=26643224900en_US

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