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Article: Cardiovascular response to stress after middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats

TitleCardiovascular response to stress after middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainres
Citation
Brain Research, 1997, v. 747 n. 2, p. 181-188 How to Cite?
AbstractPreviously, we have shown cardiovascular and autonomic disturbances in male Wistar rats following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Using this model, neurochemical changes, that were maximal at 3-5 days and subsiding by day 10, were observed unilaterally in the insular cortex and amygdala. The amygdalar neurochemical changes may be related to the stroke-induced cardiovascular disturbances, since the amygdala is critical in mediating the cardiovascular responses to stress. We examined the cardiovascular responses to intermittent and continuous noise and air-jet stimulation in male Wistar rats on days 2-10 after right-sided MCAO or sham MCAO. Compared to the sham MCAO rats, intermittent noise elicited significant tachycardiac responses on days 5 and 7 after stroke. Air-jet stimulation also elicited a significant tachycardic response on day 5, whereas continuous noise produced significant tachycardiac and pressor responses at days 5 and 7, respectively, in the MCAO rats compared to the control rats. Analyses on the heart rate variability using fast Fourier transformation revealed significant increases in the normalized mid-frequency spectral power on day 7 for intermittent noise and air-jet stimulation, suggesting increases in the sympathetic activity. These results indicate a time-course of exaggerated cardiovascular responses to stress and suggest a state of susceptibility to cardiac perturbations in rats following stroke.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162169
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.561
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.351
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, RTFen_US
dc.contributor.authorHachinski, VCen_US
dc.contributor.authorCechetto, DFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:17:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:17:46Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationBrain Research, 1997, v. 747 n. 2, p. 181-188en_US
dc.identifier.issn0006-8993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162169-
dc.description.abstractPreviously, we have shown cardiovascular and autonomic disturbances in male Wistar rats following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Using this model, neurochemical changes, that were maximal at 3-5 days and subsiding by day 10, were observed unilaterally in the insular cortex and amygdala. The amygdalar neurochemical changes may be related to the stroke-induced cardiovascular disturbances, since the amygdala is critical in mediating the cardiovascular responses to stress. We examined the cardiovascular responses to intermittent and continuous noise and air-jet stimulation in male Wistar rats on days 2-10 after right-sided MCAO or sham MCAO. Compared to the sham MCAO rats, intermittent noise elicited significant tachycardiac responses on days 5 and 7 after stroke. Air-jet stimulation also elicited a significant tachycardic response on day 5, whereas continuous noise produced significant tachycardiac and pressor responses at days 5 and 7, respectively, in the MCAO rats compared to the control rats. Analyses on the heart rate variability using fast Fourier transformation revealed significant increases in the normalized mid-frequency spectral power on day 7 for intermittent noise and air-jet stimulation, suggesting increases in the sympathetic activity. These results indicate a time-course of exaggerated cardiovascular responses to stress and suggest a state of susceptibility to cardiac perturbations in rats following stroke.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAmygdala - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshArterial Occlusive Diseases - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Arteries - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortex - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshElectrocardiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshFourier Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Rate - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Wistaren_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Physiological - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.titleCardiovascular response to stress after middle cerebral artery occlusion in ratsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, RTF:rtcheung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, RTF=rp00434en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0006-8993(96)01137-7en_US
dc.identifier.pmid9045992-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030614359en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros23281-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030614359&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume747en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage181en_US
dc.identifier.epage188en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997WJ06900001-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, RTF=7202397498en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHachinski, VC=7101953309en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCechetto, DF=7006226109en_US

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