File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Transient outward and delayed rectifier currents in canine atrium: Properties and role of isolation methods

TitleTransient outward and delayed rectifier currents in canine atrium: Properties and role of isolation methods
Authors
KeywordsAntiarrhythmic Drugs
Cardiac Electrophysiology
Chloride Channels
Heart
Potassium Channels
Issue Date1996
PublisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://intl-ajpheart.physiology.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Physiology - Heart And Circulatory Physiology, 1996, v. 39 n. 6, p. H2157-H2168 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough the dog is the principal species used for in vivo studies of atrial arrhythmias, little is known about currents governing canine atrial repolarization. Cells were isolated from dog atria by exposure to collagenase of tissue in vitro ('chunk cells') and by arterial perfusion ('perfusion cells'). Whole cell voltage clamp revealed transient outward K + current (I(to1)), Ca 2+-dependent Cl - current (I(to2)), and delayed rectifier K + current (I(K)). I(to1) recovered rapidly and showed little frequency dependence. Two components of I(K) were present as follows: a rapidly activating E-4031-sensitive current with marked inward rectification and a slower-activating E-4031-insensitive component. I(to1) and I(K) resembled corresponding currents previously described in human atrium. Transient outward currents were similar in chunk and perfusion cells, but I(K) was seen in 4% of chunk cells vs. 99% of perfusion cells (P < 0.001). Suppression of each identified current retarded canine action potential repolarization. We conclude that I(to1), I(to2), and both components of I(K) are present in dog atrium, I(K) is much more sensitive to the isolation method than I(to1) or I(to2), and the properties of two important repolarizing currents (I(to1) and I(K)) previously described in human atrium are similar to those in dog atrium.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162122
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.324
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.823
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYue, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, GRen_US
dc.contributor.authorNattel, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:17:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:17:27Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Physiology - Heart And Circulatory Physiology, 1996, v. 39 n. 6, p. H2157-H2168en_US
dc.identifier.issn0363-6135en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162122-
dc.description.abstractAlthough the dog is the principal species used for in vivo studies of atrial arrhythmias, little is known about currents governing canine atrial repolarization. Cells were isolated from dog atria by exposure to collagenase of tissue in vitro ('chunk cells') and by arterial perfusion ('perfusion cells'). Whole cell voltage clamp revealed transient outward K + current (I(to1)), Ca 2+-dependent Cl - current (I(to2)), and delayed rectifier K + current (I(K)). I(to1) recovered rapidly and showed little frequency dependence. Two components of I(K) were present as follows: a rapidly activating E-4031-sensitive current with marked inward rectification and a slower-activating E-4031-insensitive component. I(to1) and I(K) resembled corresponding currents previously described in human atrium. Transient outward currents were similar in chunk and perfusion cells, but I(K) was seen in 4% of chunk cells vs. 99% of perfusion cells (P < 0.001). Suppression of each identified current retarded canine action potential repolarization. We conclude that I(to1), I(to2), and both components of I(K) are present in dog atrium, I(K) is much more sensitive to the isolation method than I(to1) or I(to2), and the properties of two important repolarizing currents (I(to1) and I(K)) previously described in human atrium are similar to those in dog atrium.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://intl-ajpheart.physiology.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectAntiarrhythmic Drugs-
dc.subjectCardiac Electrophysiology-
dc.subjectChloride Channels-
dc.subjectHeart-
dc.subjectPotassium Channels-
dc.subject.meshAction Potentialsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAtrial Functionen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Separation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshElectric Conductivityen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshKineticsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMyocardium - Cytologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPatch-Clamp Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshPerfusionen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleTransient outward and delayed rectifier currents in canine atrium: Properties and role of isolation methodsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, GR:grli@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, GR=rp00476en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid8764269-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029775154en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0029775154&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spageH2157en_US
dc.identifier.epageH2168en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYue, L=7101974873en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFeng, J=7403884361en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, GR=7408462932en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNattel, S=36048738800en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats