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Article: Thyroxine suppressive therapy decreases bone mineral density in post-menopausal women

TitleThyroxine suppressive therapy decreases bone mineral density in post-menopausal women
Authors
Issue Date1993
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 1993, v. 39 n. 5, p. 535-540 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Hyperthyroidism is associated with increased bone turnover and decreased bone mass. This study aimed to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) of post-menopausal women on long-term thyroxine suppressive therapy. Design: An age and sex-matched cross-sectional study. Patients: Thirty-four post-menopausal women with carcinoma of thyroid, post total thyroidectomy and 131I ablation, on L-T4 for 12.2 ± 6.6 years (mean ± SD). Controls were 34 age-matched healthy Southern Chinese women. Measurements: Total body and regional BMDs were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone turnover was assessed by biochemical markers. Results: In the thyroxine treated group, total body mineral content was significantly lower than the controls (1652 ± 356 vs 1994 ± 270 g mean ± SD, P < 0.005). They also had lower BMDs in the lumbar spine, femoral neck, trochanter and Ward's triangle (0.75 ± 0.15 vs 0.92 ± 0.16 g/cm2, P < 0.005; 0.62 ± 0.12 vs 0.70 ± 0.12 g/cm2, P < 0.01; 0.55 ± 0.14 vs 0.63 ± 0.15 g/cm2, P < 0.001; 0.55 ± 0.14 vs 0.63 ± 0.14 g/cm2, P < 0.005 respectively). The thyroxine treated group also had higher serum alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin levels as well as urinary hydroxyproline excretion, suggesting that they had high turnover bone loss. However, the Z-scores of the various regional BMDs were correlated only with the serum osteocalcin level and showed no correlation with the serum thyroxine level or with the dosage or duration of thyroxine treatment. Conclusion: Long-term thyroxine suppressive therapy was associated with bone loss and preventive therapy may be indicated in these post-menopausal women at risk of osteoporosis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162006
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKung, AWCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLorentz, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, SCFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:16:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:16:35Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 1993, v. 39 n. 5, p. 535-540en_US
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/162006-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Hyperthyroidism is associated with increased bone turnover and decreased bone mass. This study aimed to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) of post-menopausal women on long-term thyroxine suppressive therapy. Design: An age and sex-matched cross-sectional study. Patients: Thirty-four post-menopausal women with carcinoma of thyroid, post total thyroidectomy and 131I ablation, on L-T4 for 12.2 ± 6.6 years (mean ± SD). Controls were 34 age-matched healthy Southern Chinese women. Measurements: Total body and regional BMDs were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone turnover was assessed by biochemical markers. Results: In the thyroxine treated group, total body mineral content was significantly lower than the controls (1652 ± 356 vs 1994 ± 270 g mean ± SD, P < 0.005). They also had lower BMDs in the lumbar spine, femoral neck, trochanter and Ward's triangle (0.75 ± 0.15 vs 0.92 ± 0.16 g/cm2, P < 0.005; 0.62 ± 0.12 vs 0.70 ± 0.12 g/cm2, P < 0.01; 0.55 ± 0.14 vs 0.63 ± 0.15 g/cm2, P < 0.001; 0.55 ± 0.14 vs 0.63 ± 0.14 g/cm2, P < 0.005 respectively). The thyroxine treated group also had higher serum alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin levels as well as urinary hydroxyproline excretion, suggesting that they had high turnover bone loss. However, the Z-scores of the various regional BMDs were correlated only with the serum osteocalcin level and showed no correlation with the serum thyroxine level or with the dosage or duration of thyroxine treatment. Conclusion: Long-term thyroxine suppressive therapy was associated with bone loss and preventive therapy may be indicated in these post-menopausal women at risk of osteoporosis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAbsorptiometry, Photonen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Density - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIodine Radioisotopes - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOsteocalcin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshPostmenopause - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Perioden_US
dc.subject.meshThyroid Function Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshThyroid Neoplasms - Blood - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshThyroidectomyen_US
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshThyroxine - Adverse Effects - Blood - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.titleThyroxine suppressive therapy decreases bone mineral density in post-menopausal womenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKung, AWC:awckung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKung, AWC=rp00368en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.1993.tb02405.x-
dc.identifier.pmid8252741-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027496389en_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage535en_US
dc.identifier.epage540en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993MD39800005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKung, AWC=7102322339en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLorentz, T=6602819345en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, SCF=7202037323en_US

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