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Article: General practitioners' use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Tayside and Fife regions

TitleGeneral practitioners' use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Tayside and Fife regions
Authors
Issue Date1992
PublisherRoyal Society of Medicine Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.roysocmed.ac.uk/pub/jrsm.htm
Citation
Journal Of The Royal Society Of Medicine, 1992, v. 85 n. 8, p. 442-445 How to Cite?
AbstractThe objectives of this study were to assess the prescribing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) by general practitioners and to determine their attitudes to problems caused by this class of drugs. The study consisted of two parts. The first was a questionnaire survey among general practitioners in Fife and Tayside, and the second was an analysis of NSAID prescribing over 12 months among the doctors in the Carnoustie Health Centre, using duplicate prescriptions. In the questionnaire survey 61% of the general practitioners responded. The three most preferred drugs were buprofen (56%), naproxen (20%) and mefenamic acid (7%); choice of drug was determined by efficacy and personal experience. Gastrointestinal side effects were most frequently encountered, although there was little consensus amongst respondents as to their management. The duplicate prescription study showed that 14% of patients (1607 individuals) received at least one NSAID prescription in the year of study. Ibuprofen (31%), naproxen (20%) and piroxicam (15%) were most frequently prescribed and up to 16% of the patients were co-prescribed a gastroprotective agent; ranitidine (75%) was the most commonly prescribed. Despite the introduction of newer NSAIDs, ibuprofen and naproxen are still the most commonly prescribed drugs. Furthermore, although gastrointestinal side effects are commonly encountered, there is some uncertainty about their management.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161940
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.784
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.636
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKeys, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeardon, PHGen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, CCen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcdevitt, DGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:16:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:16:11Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The Royal Society Of Medicine, 1992, v. 85 n. 8, p. 442-445en_US
dc.identifier.issn0141-0768en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161940-
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this study were to assess the prescribing of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) by general practitioners and to determine their attitudes to problems caused by this class of drugs. The study consisted of two parts. The first was a questionnaire survey among general practitioners in Fife and Tayside, and the second was an analysis of NSAID prescribing over 12 months among the doctors in the Carnoustie Health Centre, using duplicate prescriptions. In the questionnaire survey 61% of the general practitioners responded. The three most preferred drugs were buprofen (56%), naproxen (20%) and mefenamic acid (7%); choice of drug was determined by efficacy and personal experience. Gastrointestinal side effects were most frequently encountered, although there was little consensus amongst respondents as to their management. The duplicate prescription study showed that 14% of patients (1607 individuals) received at least one NSAID prescription in the year of study. Ibuprofen (31%), naproxen (20%) and piroxicam (15%) were most frequently prescribed and up to 16% of the patients were co-prescribed a gastroprotective agent; ranitidine (75%) was the most commonly prescribed. Despite the introduction of newer NSAIDs, ibuprofen and naproxen are still the most commonly prescribed drugs. Furthermore, although gastrointestinal side effects are commonly encountered, there is some uncertainty about their management.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Medicine Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.roysocmed.ac.uk/pub/jrsm.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Royal Society of Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAnti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude Of Health Personnelen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshChoice Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshFamily Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patternsen_US
dc.subject.meshScotlanden_US
dc.titleGeneral practitioners' use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in Tayside and Fife regionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, C:cslau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, C=rp01348en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1404187-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026688229en_US
dc.identifier.volume85en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage442en_US
dc.identifier.epage445en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992JF34000005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKeys, J=7004541890en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBeardon, PHG=6603223859en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, C=14035682100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, CC=7402002432en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcDevitt, DG=7102864592en_US

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